Rebirth in Sylvia Plath's Lady Lazarus, Fever 103, Getting There, and Cut

Rebirth in Sylvia Plath's Lady Lazarus, Fever 103, Getting There, and Cut

Length: 1293 words (3.7 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Rebirth in Lady Lazarus, Fever 103, Getting There, and Cut  


    The Ariel-period poems of Sylvia Plath demonstrate her desire for rebirth, to escape the body that was "drummed into use" by men and society. I will illustrate the different types of rebirth with examples from the Ariel poems, including "Lady Lazarus," "Fever 103," "Getting There," and "Cut."

"Lady Lazarus," the last of the October poems, presents Plath as the victim with her aggression turned towards "her male victimizer (33)." Lady Lazarus arises from Herr Doktor's ovens as a new being, her own incarnation, "the victim taking on the powers of the victimizers and drumming herself into uses that are her own" (33). Linda Bundtzen also sees the poem as "an allegory about the woman artist's struggle for autonomy. The female creature of a male artist-god is asserting independent creative powers" (33). Plath confronts Herr Doktor:

Herr God, Herr Lucifer
Beware
Beware.
Out of the ash
I rise with my red hair
And I eat men like air. (Plath 246-247)

Lady Lazarus after her psychic death became stronger than her creator: " Male- female antagonism ends with the woman defiantly asserting power over her body and releasing its energies for her own ends" (Bundtzen 233). While the outcome of the poem is positive, "Plath turns on herself, identifying with her oppressor, and sadistically punishes her body in the process of
recreating it" (Bundtzen 237).

Plath did not see the rebirth process as a pleasant experience, but one that is expected of her "I guess you could say I've got a call" (Plath 245). She, however, sees the benefits that come from her suffering and continues the process again and again. "Fever 103" is also about a women releasing herself from...


... middle of paper ...


...poems what she thought she could not or did not achieve in life: the ability to do as she wanted, to be a mother and wife but not constricted into a domestic hell or to be pinned down by the oppressive society which did not accept her for being a poetess. She was able to "still speak from within her "deeper self" through her writing" (Kinsey-Clinton 1).

 

Works Cited
Alvarez, A. Sylvia Plath : A Memoir. New York: Harper and Row, 1985.
Bundtzen, Lynda K. Plath's Incarnations: Woman and the Creative Process.
USA: University of Michigan, 1988.
Kinsey-Clinton, Michelle. Once Upon a Time. (Online) Available http://www.sapphireblue.com/abyss404.html , August 17, 1998.
Perloff, Marjorie. "Angst and Animism in the Poetry of Sylvia Plath". Journal
Of Modern Literature. 1970: 57-74 .
Plath Sylvia. The Collected Poems. New York: Harper Perennial, 1992.

 

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Cut by sylvia Plath Essay

- “Cut” Sylvia Plath Persona In terms of content the persona in “Cut” is Sylvia Plath herself. Plath was one of the first American women writers to refuse to conceal her true emotions. In articulating her aggression, hostility and despair in her art, she effectively challenged the traditional literary prioritization of female experience. Plath has experienced much melancholy and depression in her life. Scenario The scenario of the poem starts off in a seemingly domestic scene, perhaps preparing for dinner and develops into this amazing association and blurring of the physical and emotional senses, where a great joy has been found in an ‘accident’....   [tags: essays research papers]

Strong Essays
1613 words (4.6 pages)

Is Neuromancer a cut-up Future? Essay

- Neuromancer a cut-up future. William S. Burroughs was an innovative writer who experimented with technology and the cut-up method in his postmodernist works. William Gibson follows suit with that cut-up method in his post-modernist groundbreaking science fiction novel Neuromancer, in which he uses a rapid stream of images and the disassociation of people with each other in a technologically advanced, corporate controlled society. Burroughs wants “cut-ups to establish new connections between images, and one’s range of vision consequently expands” (Knickerbocker 3)....   [tags: writer, technology, cut-up]

Strong Essays
823 words (2.4 pages)

The Bell Jar By Sylvia Plath Essay

- The Bell Jar, written by Sylvia Plath, starts of in the summer of the mid-1950s. Esther Greenwood, the main character, is a 19 year full of ambition and creativity that works at a popular magazine company. Esther mainly has two “best friends”, Betsy and Doreen. Having a pretty decent life in New York she feels as though she is missing something and that she isn’t experiencing life as some of the other ladies her age are. Esther is faced with the thought of not being what she should be. Which is, what the other women of her age are expected to be, by society’s views....   [tags: The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath]

Strong Essays
1641 words (4.7 pages)

Essay about The Benefits of Cut-Through Architecture

- In computer networking, cut through architecture is a method used for packet switching system. In this system the data frame or packets began to leave the switch almost as soon as it begins to enter the switch. In simple words, a cut through architecture does not store a data frame and then forward it. On the other hand, The other device hold the entire frame for a small amount of time while the various fields of the frame are examined, this procedure makes the overall network throughput very slow or diminish it....   [tags: Cut-through vs store-and-forward]

Strong Essays
2476 words (7.1 pages)

The Bell Jar By Sylvia Plath Essay

- Life is full of endless amounts of beautiful encounters for every character in the novel The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, except for Esther. She suffers from a severe and complex mental illness that impacts her life greatly. Although it is clear that Esther suffers strongly from depression in the novel, Sylvia Plath chooses to tell her life abstractly through countless symbols and ironies to prove that Esther depression completely consumes her. Everything that Esther sees is through a lens of depression, which scews her outlook on life....   [tags: The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath, Roman à clef]

Strong Essays
1229 words (3.5 pages)

Lady Lazarus, By Sylvia Plath Essay

- Makayla Williams Mrs. Mandy Feasel AP English III 11 May 2015 “Lady Lazarus:” Free to Die “Lady Lazarus,” a poem widely known for its dark images and symbolism, captures the reader’s attention and entices him or her with a sense of familiarity with Lazarus; however, the comfortable feeling shatters as the reader takes a frightening journey through the life and deaths of Lady Lazarus. Sylvia Plath’s “Lady Lazarus” is semi- autobiographical in that through the pseudonym of Lady Lazarus, Plath uses her own personal issues and growing frustration with her oppressing father as the starting point to express her ideas on bigger issues such as the Holocaust, universal oppression, and the inhumanit...   [tags: Sylvia Plath, Ted Hughes, Suicide, Assia Wevill]

Strong Essays
1534 words (4.4 pages)

Analysis Of `` Morning Song `` By Sylvia Plath Essay

- “Morning Song” is a poem that was written by Sylvia Plath and published shortly after her death in 1965. It is a poem that openly expresses the depression she was going through leading to the events that caused her death. The poem represents the hope a baby brings to the world and the effect it has on his/her mother. It is a lyric poem that contains eighteen lines and six stanzas. Plath uses imagery, tone, metaphor to convey the impact a new life has on not only the world but on her as well. Born on October 27, 1932 in Boston, Massachusetts, Sylvia Plath was a daughter to Aurelia Schober and Otto Plath....   [tags: Poetry, Sylvia Plath, Stanza, Tercet]

Strong Essays
1191 words (3.4 pages)

Little Fugue and Morning Song by Sylvia Plath Essay

- A relationship is an emotional connection to someone involving an interaction between two or more people. There are many types of relationships, some functional and others far from being workable. I will demonstrate this through my texts of; Little Fugue, and Morning Song both poems written by Sylvia Plath; the movie, Love Actually; and the book, Trickster’s Choice by Tamora Pierce. Little Fugue by Sylvia Plath is my first example of how we all perceive our different relationships. This poem is about Plath talking of her father and herself and the lack of communication between the two....   [tags: Sylvia Plath Poem Poetry]

Strong Essays
1480 words (4.2 pages)

Sylvia Plath's Mirror Essay

- Sylvia Plath's Mirror Sylvia Plath's "Mirror" offers a unique perspective on the attitudes of aging. "Mirror" displays tremendous insight and objectivity into the natural human behavior of growing older. Plath is able to emphasize the loneliness, hope, despair, and insecurity that awaits us through mankind's incessant addiction with reflection. "Mirror" expresses the problems associated with aging through terse comparisons between reality and desire. Plathe's strength of "Mirror" lies in its ability to establish a solid comparison among appearance and human emotions between the first and second stanzas....   [tags: Papers Sylvia Plath Poem Poetry Essays]

Strong Essays
804 words (2.3 pages)

Sylvia Plath Essay

- Sylvia Plath was a gifted writer, poet and verbal artist whose personal anguish and torment visibly manifested itself in her work. Much of her angst stems from her warped relationship with her father. Other factors that influenced her works were her strained views of human sexuality, her sado-masochistic tendencies, self-hatred and her traditional upbringing. She was labeled as a confessional poet and biographical and historical material is absolutely necessary to understand her work. Syliva Plath was born on 27, 1963, in Boston, Massachusetts to Otto Emil Plath and Aurelia Schober....   [tags: Sylvia Plath Biography Biographies Essays]

Strong Essays
2097 words (6 pages)