Fear of Polio Essays

Fear of Polio Essays

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Fear Of The Unknown
GMO Products
Parents and children today may have no memory of the dreaded disease called polio, which struck both young and old by the score from the 1930s to the 1950s. School children and parents were as frightened of polio as they were of nuclear bomb attacks on the United States.
When the polio vaccine was finally discovered, people all over America were inoculated. Still, there were scores of people who did not trust doctors, did not like the use of needles – and some who even feared that the vaccine would give their child polio. Anti-vaccine propaganda and rumors were spread to the public. Some of the unvaccinated number continued to contract the crippling and deadly disease. But occurrence of polio is almost, or totally, nonexistent in the United States today, thanks to the success of this cure -- and the backing of the U.S. Government.
The point of this bit of history is to show the side of human nature that fears the unknown. Take GMO, Genetically Modified Organisms, for example. Fear of commodities such as soybeans, wheat and corn grown from GMO seed, has sent shockwaves through Europe and brought increasing concern right to our front door, the place where the miraculous seed was developed.
Current public concern is the result of a wide-ranging, well-financed propaganda campaign of negatives – negatives intended to strike fear in the hearts of countless consumers "over there" and now, over here. Government agricultural agencies of var...

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Fear of Polio Essays

- Fear Of The Unknown GMO Products Parents and children today may have no memory of the dreaded disease called polio, which struck both young and old by the score from the 1930s to the 1950s. School children and parents were as frightened of polio as they were of nuclear bomb attacks on the United States. When the polio vaccine was finally discovered, people all over America were inoculated. Still, there were scores of people who did not trust doctors, did not like the use of needles – and some who even feared that the vaccine would give their child polio....   [tags: essays research papers]

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