Essay on Canadian Indian Act

Essay on Canadian Indian Act

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The first Canadian Indian Act was issued in 1876. Though it has been revised

numerous times, this hundred and thirty year old legislation has been left virtually

unchanged. Established in order to ensure the assimilation of Native Americans in

Canada, the Indian Act instead had achieved the total opposite. It has made this

distinction more and has given immense power to the government, letting them control

all who reside on the reserves. It was then that the distinction between Status Indians and

Non-Status Indians was made. The Canadian government quickly displayed their control

by forbidding the sale of any land within the reserve unless it was turned over to the

Crown.

Another major part of the act was the enfranchisement of the Native American.

When most refused to become enfranchised, the government made it so all Native

Americans obtaining a University degree would automatically become enfranchised. In

the amendment of 1884, the government banned the potlatch ceremony (a popular

celebration among the First Nations an the Pacific Coast) for they believe it was a corrupt

and destructive ritual. In 1951, after the imprisonment of numerous Natives, this

legislation was dropped by the act. In 1927, it became forbidden for any person to raise

money for Aboriginal in order to pursue any claim, unless permission was granted by the

Superintendent General of Indian Affairs, yet attempt in making them absolutely

dependent of the government. The ...

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