Essay on Rude Boy Music In Comparison With Gangster Rap

Essay on Rude Boy Music In Comparison With Gangster Rap

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Rude Boy Music In Comparison With Gangster Rap

Reggae music is a very powerful way of communicating a message to its listener’s. Reggae has evolved over time from many different types of music and lots of different forms from ska to reggae. The history of reggae starts over 400 years ago in the days of slavery. Under the severe oppression of slavery the African people tried to hold on the pieces of their culture that they could. Music and dance were among the most important cultural traditions retained by the African people. These African rhythms gave way to mento, which gave rise to Rastafarian chants, which in turn gave way to ska and then rocksteady. (Potash, 29) When reggae music is thought of, Jamaica is instantly the word that comes to most peoples mind. Reggae music is also associated closely with the smoking of ganja. Generally people are uneducated about Rastafarianism, and don’t know that smoking marijuana is a sacrament of their religion. Just like Christians eat bread and drink wine at mass, for the Rastafarians ganja is a way to get closer to Jah or their God. The Rastafarian's God was proclaimed Haile Selassie the King of Ethiopia. The man who predicted this was Marcus Garvey a native Jamaican was an advocate of black unity and pride. Garvey was the one who told the African people that their savior would be the next king crowned in Africa. The Jamaican people revered Garvey and believed in what he preached, and when Haile Selassie was crowned the king of Ethiopia the Rastafarian people rejoiced with their new God, Haile Selassie. The Rastafarian’s loved Selassie, even though Selassie didn’t ask or want to be their God. Selassie made a visit to Jamaica in April of 1966, and when he first landed the thousands of Ras...


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...uide. London: Rough Guides Ltd, 1997.

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Chang, Kevin, and Wayne Chen. Reggae Routes. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1998.

Davis, Stephen, and Peter Simon. Reggae Bloodlines. New York: Da Capo Press, 1977.

Dekker, Desmond. “ 007 (Shanty Town).” http://hjem.get2net.dk/sbn/reggae.htm.

Dogg, Snoop. “Street life.” <www.lyricsfind.com/view.php?id=7770>.

Foster, Chuck. Roots Rock Reggae. New York: Billboard Books, 1999.

Potash, Chris. Reggae, Rasta, Revolution. London: Schirmer Books, 1997.

Shakur, Tupac. “16 on Death Row.” <www.lyricsfind.com/view.php?id=7770>.

“Violence in Jamaica: When will it stop?” Amnesty International. <http://www.amnesty-caribbean.org/Jamaica/AMR3800101/bericht.htm>.

White, Garth. “Caribbean Quarterly.” www.thegleaner.com.

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