Emerson's Theories of Education vs Modern-day Theories Essay

Emerson's Theories of Education vs Modern-day Theories Essay

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Emerson and today’s theories of education view discipline as necessary for the progress of students in the classroom; however, Emerson’s beliefs differ from modern-day theories of discipline in "respecting a child" encompassing "patience", "the receiving mind" and "discovers for himself his goal in life." Emerson realized that progressive learning is not a dictator relationship. "Respecting a child" will enhance the student’s ability to achieve their goals.

As today’s society lives in the fast lane so does our educational society. "So to regard a young child, the young man, requires, no doubt, rare patience: a patience that nothing but faith in the remedial forces of the soul can give" (Gilman 444). Patience is this unattainable trait that people seek, but never find. Our society is a whirling downfall of enormous debt because of the lack of patience that so many people have adopted as a way of life. Stores are full of consumers that "must have" at that very moment. Unfortunately, the same philosophy of thought is embedded in today’s education. Evaluating today’s theories of education, patience is a luxury that can not be spared.

The new "No child left behind" legislation theorizes the idea that standardized testing will improve the instruction level of students. In actualization, the government is teaching the students and the teachers are their puppets. The government likes to call this education reform, however in many eyes it is education death. "The 100 percent goal was simply a target, an admittedly unreachable goal designed to motivate schools to stretch themselves to do better, such as scientists trying to cure cancer or gardeners hoping to grow the perfect tomato" (Matthews 1). Beginning with the first day of school...


... middle of paper ...


... How does society "respect a child" when education is consumed with close-mindedness, repetition, dictatorship and sinful nature.



References:

Bracey, Gerald W. Are US Students Behind? Web 20 Nov 2014.
Http: www.prospect.org/print/V9/37/bracey-g.html

Dorja, Rig’dzin. Dangerous Friend: The teacher –student relationship in Vajnayana Buddhism. Web 20 Nov 2014.
http://www. Samadhicushions.com/Samadhi.cgi/S-1998

Gilman, William H. Selected Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson. A Signet Classic. New York, New York 10014

Matthews, Jay. No Child Left Behind Act: Facts and Fiction. Web 20 Nov 2014.
http://www.washingtonpost.com /ac2/wp-dyn/A23818- 2003Nov10?language=printer.

Swanson, Robert. Web 20 Nov 2014.
http://www.sudval.org/users/archives/dsm4

Years of Schooling Smother Creativity. Web 20 Nov 2014.
jordan.dpsnc.net/fcmqr1998/schooling.html

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