Essay on The NWMP: Development of Early Canadian Law Enforcement

Essay on The NWMP: Development of Early Canadian Law Enforcement

Length: 882 words (2.5 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The NWMP: Development of Early Canadian Law Enforcement

  The creation of the North-West Mounted Police in 1873 was the "ultimate expression of the federal government’s control over policing" (Johnson & Griffiths: 1991, 29). The North-West Mounted Police (NWMP), predecessors of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) were created by the government of John A. MacDonald to police the prairies. Prior to the development of the NWMP, the only form of law enforcement came from employees of the Hudson Bay Company who had established their own penal code. The purpose of the NWMP was "to protect the ‘Indians’ from Americans and to bring the Queen’s justice to a lawless, dangerous territory" (Johnson & Griffiths: 1991, 30). However, some people contend that the NWMP was created not to aide the Natives but to assimilate them once the fur trade declined (Johnson & Griffiths: 1991). Whatever its purpose, 300 men set out from Manitoba in the summer of 1874 on the "Long March" to stop the "American lawlessness" from spreading (Johnson & Griffiths: 1991).

  During the "Long March" the NWMP travelled along the U.S. border "to the den of the American whiskey traders and the source of most of their concern: Fort Hamilton", otherwise known as Fort Whoop-up (Johnson & Griffiths: 1991). Along the way to Fort Whoop-up, groups of Mounties stayed on at pre-designated locations to set up detachments. The final group that arrived at Fort Whoop-up found it deserted except for a small group of Natives. Many claimed that the Americans left out of fear of the Mounties. According to Johnson and Griffiths "the ability of Canada’s Mounted Police to maintain law and order on a vast frontier has become legendary, the quintessential Canadian image" (1991, 30)...


... middle of paper ...


...ed for murder and Big Bear was given an incarceration term of three years.

 The North-West Rebellion in 1885 "merely excaberated the already-deteriorating relationship between the NWMP and the aboriginal peoples of the area" (Johnson & Griffiths: 1991, 35). The mutual respect between the Mounties and Natives diminished with the creation of the Department of Indian Affairs in the early 1880s. The Department’s goals were assimilation and segregation of Natives on reserves, as well as the pass system. The NWMP were the enforcers of these policies and it was only at the end of the Nineteenth Century that the Mounties were given a new mandate with the advent of the Klondike Gold Rush.

References:

Johnson, M., & Griffiths, C. (1991). Canadian Criminology. Toronto: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

RCMP Home Page January, 2000 [http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/html/]. 

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Evironmental Law: Enforcement Measures And Effectiveness Essay

- Evironmental Law: Enforcement Measures and Effectiveness Pollution, why is it still running rampant in our environment today . Are there no laws to control or stop it . In regards to these questions, Canada has a great many laws to stop and regulate pollution. But despite this, why is it still happening. What are Canada's so called enforcement measures and are they effective . We have the Environmental Bill of Rights and the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, just to name a few. Sure some polluters break these laws and get caught, but all they get is a slap on the wrist; why is that ....   [tags: essays research papers]

Better Essays
1856 words (5.3 pages)

Essay on Promoting Diversity in Canadian Police Recruiting

- Promoting Diversity in Canadian Police Recruiting  The process of police recruiting has undergone several radical changes in recent times due to the increasing political pressures on police to adequately reflect the diversity of Canadian society. These changes are the attempts to correct past wrongs of previous recruiting practices, which have led to the dominance of a white male presence in the police forces. During the 1970’s, the recruitment of white males became so systematic that recruiting officers often made petty attempts to recruit females and those of visible ethnic minorities....   [tags: Law Enforcement]

Better Essays
917 words (2.6 pages)

My Paths into Law Enforcement Essays

- My Paths into Law Enforcement There are many different career paths that make up the professional field of Law Enforcement in this country and around the world. It has been a dream of mine to be part something that is bigger than myself, that offers the opportunity to help the community I live in. To me, Law Enforcement offers me that chance. It is also the closest thing to the military that I believe will allow me to put to use what I have learned and experienced from my time in the U.S. Army....   [tags: Law Enforcement]

Better Essays
1966 words (5.6 pages)

Improving Law Enforcement's Approach to Combating Organized Crime Essay

- Introduction Organized crime involves a group of people made up of several ethnicities and international unions, who coordinate as well as work in unison, apart, or in line with legal enterprises alongside political realms. Many analysts have concurred that organized crime is both an impediment to academic projects and a realistic social issue that obligates urgent solution. Strategies implemented to limit organized crime often tend to be inclined towards one form of the two approaches. One of the approaches is tailored on dealing with individual members of the criminal gangs, whereas the second stresses on the structural aspects along with market networks that assist in accomplishing organ...   [tags: Crime, Law, Law Enforcements]

Better Essays
1317 words (3.8 pages)

Essay on Law Enforcement and the Rights of the Accused

- Law Enforcement and the Rights of the Accused   Law Enforcement and the Rights of the Accused In this paper, I will discuss Amendments VI, V, VI and VIII which give rights to the accused. I will also examine how these rights affect law enforcement procedures. I will then give details on which law enforcement agencies each amendment affects and how. Amendment VI gives the people the right against unreasonable search and seizure. It also states that a warrant has to be signed by a judge and cannot be issued without probably cause....   [tags: Law Enforcement]

Better Essays
1434 words (4.1 pages)

Essay on Law Enforcement Officers and Their Families

- Law Enforcement Officers and Their Families The law enforcement officers who protect and serve the local communities have and live stressful lives. How stressful is the occupation of a law enforcement officer in their job and in their personal lives than other occupations. How hard would it be to be a spouse or loved one of a law enforcement officer. Does the public know what goes on in a law enforcement officer's job life and the life of their family. Could the average person handle the daily stress that takes place in the lives of law enforcement officers....   [tags: Law Enforcement ]

Better Essays
1652 words (4.7 pages)

Use of Force in Law Enforcement Essay

- When a law enforcement officer uses force on a subject it will be classified into one of three main categories which are, justifiable, excessive, and deadly force. The authority for law enforcement officers to use force comes from the United States Constitution (case law), state statutes, and department policy. Law enforcement use of force is very important because it involves the patrolman on the street, the corrections officer in jails and prisons, and the courts where excessive use of force cases are held....   [tags: Law Enforcement]

Better Essays
2253 words (6.4 pages)

Law Enforcement in The Community of Shartlesville Essay

- January is the start of a New Year; a time when many are celebrating their New Year’s resolutions and enjoying a day off from work. This year, the community of Shartlesville, Pennsylvania had no such luck. I woke up that day and almost swallowed my toothpaste (not to mention my toothbrush). I looked out the window of my bathroom to see the door to my Ford Explorer wide open. I ran out the front door, shoe-less, to take inventory. The Garmin GPS unit, a gift I received for Christmas, was missing....   [tags: Law Enforcement]

Better Essays
1423 words (4.1 pages)

Essay on The Newest Technology in Law Enforcement

- The license plate reader, LPR is a mobile plate hunter that comprises of a camera(s) placed on the outside of a squad car that is then connected to a computer database inside the squad car. The plate hunter has the capacity to recognize the character on a number plate and rapidly relay the information to the database computer that would verify of the owner or the automobile has any record or if the vehicle has been reported stolen/missing. This ability is even possible when the squad car is moving at 75 mph and can check up to 3, 000 number plates within an hour....   [tags: Law Enforcement ]

Better Essays
857 words (2.4 pages)

Law Enforcement Careers Essay

- Introduction To be perfectly honest, when I found out we would be working on a research paper I was a bit nervous because I know I procrastinate. I tend to leave things for the last minute which just adds unnecessary stress. I had an idea of what I wanted my future career to be but was still not 100% sure at the time. It was not until I did more research that I decided law enforcement was the career path for me. I feel as though that’s what my destiny is, what I was meant to do. I cannot imagine myself doing anything else, except for the military which also ties into law enforcement (MP-military police)....   [tags: Law Enforcement]

Better Essays
1365 words (3.9 pages)