Eradicating the Deaf-World Essay

Eradicating the Deaf-World Essay

Length: 1472 words (4.2 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Powerful Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Eradicating the Deaf-World


Just like members of other minorities, such as Hispanics and African-Americans, Deaf people experience some of the same oppression and hardships. Although the attempts to "fix" members of and obliterate the DEAF-WORLD are not as highly publicized as problems with other minorities, they still exist. Throughout time, hearing people have been trying to destroy the DEAF-WORLD with the eugenics movement, the mainstreaming of Deaf children into public hearing schools, and cochlear implants.

Overall, the eugenics movement was meant to discourage Deaf people from socializing, intermarrying, and reproducing with each other. But these goals are very much unachievable. When Deaf children are growing up in a residential school, they have no choice but to socialize with other Deaf children. Since they all pretty much use the same language, socialization is not a problem for them. Because these children grow up with others who use their language, they tend to remain close to their friends and often intermarry. Many people, including A. G. Bell, were opposed to Deaf marrying other Deaf. Bell said that sign language "causes the intermarriage of deaf-mutes and the propagation of their physical defect" (Lane, 1996:382). Bell also claimed that society was condoning the spread of "a defective race of human beings" by allowing Deaf people to socialize with each other (Jankowski, 1997:53). Since others too saw deafness as a physical defect, they agreed with Bell and started adopting oral schools for the Deaf where signed language is prohibited. If oral schools ended up being the only schools for Deaf, then their signed languages would have diminished along with a part of their heritage and culture. A long time ago, m...


... middle of paper ...


...eliminated. The eugenic movement, mainstreaming, and cochlear implants have yet to prove that the culture of Deaf people can be taken away from them, which is ultimately a wonderful thing.

Bibliography

Jankowski, Katherine A. (1997). Deaf Empowerment: Emergence, Strugge, and Rhetoric. Gallaudet University Press, Washington DC.

Lane, Harlan (1992). “Cochlear Implants are Wrong for Young Deaf Children.” Viewpoints on Deafness. Ed. Mervin D. Garretson. National Association of the Deaf, Silver Spring, MD. 89-92.

Lane, Harlan; Hoffmeister, Rob and Bahan, Ben (1996). A Journey Into the DEAF-WORLD. Dawn Sign Press, San Diego, Ca.

Padden, Carol and Humphries, Tom (1988). Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.

Sacks, Oliver (1990). Seeing Voices: A Journey Into the World of the Deaf. Harper Perennial, New York, NY.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Deaf : Deaf And Deaf Essay

- Deaf Culture is often misunderstood because the hearing world thinks of deafness as a handicap. The Deaf are not given enough credit for their disabilities even though they are unable to hear. Being misunderstood is the biggest reason why they are not accepted in the world of hearing. The learning process for them may be slower and more difficult to learn, but they are still very bright individuals. The problem at hand is the controversy of trying to “fix” the Deaf when they may or may not want to be “fixed”....   [tags: Hearing impairment, Deaf culture]

Powerful Essays
757 words (2.2 pages)

The Deaf : Deaf And Deaf Essay

- Although the Deaf community may struggle to succeed, it is possible. There are two ways to write the word deaf, and they both mean something completely different. The word deaf written with a small ‘d’ has many negative connotations such as deaf and dumb, and is in connection with audism, which is the oppression they face from hearing people who think less of them. As for the word deaf written with a big ‘D’ – Deaf, that promotes positivity in the Deaf community, that is why it is the Deaf community, not the deaf community....   [tags: Deaf culture, Sign language, Hearing impairment]

Powerful Essays
969 words (2.8 pages)

Deaf Education : Deaf And Deaf Essay

- The society we have today has grown from the knowledge passed down from generation to generation. Humans begin to learn from the moment they’re born. We are taught by family and strangers alike, but perhaps the most influential people in our lives are teachers. The average student will spend 1,260 hours a year with their teachers, that’s 16,380 hours in an average thirteen year education. But not all students are average, and some teachers are willing to go above and beyond this standard. Deaf educators take the time to teach their students how to succeed in a world not made for them, making it possible to evolve from a society where those considered deaf and dumb were incapable of living a...   [tags: Deaf culture, Sign language, Hearing impairment]

Powerful Essays
758 words (2.2 pages)

Mark Drolsbaugh 's Deaf And The Hearing World Essay

- Mark Drolsbaugh’s Deaf Again is a biography about his life between two dimensions of the Deaf world and the Hearing world as well as the implications he faced throughout his journeys’. Mark Drolsbaugh was born from two deaf parents and was basically forced to adapt to the hearing world even though his parents are deaf. When Drolsbaugh was born he was hearing, however, by first grade his parents and teachers discovered he was losing his hearing. As time went on Mark realized the issues he faced from trying to adapt to the hearing world....   [tags: Hearing impairment, Deaf culture]

Powerful Essays
1513 words (4.3 pages)

Deaf Culture And The Deaf Essay

- “Being deaf does not make you dumb, just as being hearing does not make you smart.” The author of this quote is unknown, but the concept behind these words is true in every aspect: hearing people do not know much about the Deaf culture. Our world is always quick to jump to conclusions when it comes to different people. This leads to many misconceptions and unknown realities about Deaf people and their way of life. So much is unknown about the Deaf world; for example, many do not know the qualifications for being deaf and the day to day activities deaf people can participate in....   [tags: Hearing impairment, Deaf culture, Cochlea]

Powerful Essays
2421 words (6.9 pages)

Essay about Deaf And The Deaf Community

- hear a little or not at all. It is just not black and white. That seems to be a common misconception people have about the deaf community. The deaf community has always been thought of as being “incapable” in many ways. The hearing world believes that because someone is deaf he or she cannot do things that “hearing” can. The deaf and “hard of hearing” are just as capable of living normal lives as we are. One of the few differences is that they cut off from the usual forms of communications. It leads them to feel isolated, and make it hard to get information or help in an emergency....   [tags: Deaf culture, Hearing impairment, Deafness]

Powerful Essays
1201 words (3.4 pages)

The Deaf And Deaf Community Essay

- “Through Deaf Eyes” broached many topics and issues that the Deaf community has faced in the past. Language, medical, legal, educational, and social issues are just a few of the issues that the Deaf community has faced. The documentary showed the Deaf community like I have never seen before. There were moments that inspired me, surprised me, and helped me feel that I now have a greater understanding of the Deaf community. I also learned about prominent figures that impacted the Deaf community. I now have a greater foundation to base my learning off of as I continue to learn about American Sign Language (ASL), and the Deaf community 's culture....   [tags: Sign language, Deaf culture, Hearing impairment]

Powerful Essays
1456 words (4.2 pages)

Essay on Deaf And The Deaf Community

- In the 1960’s and 70’s, the Deaf community underwent a dramatic change involving the recognition and acceptance of deafness and its associated culture by the hearing world. Before this period, deafness was largely seen by the hearing world as a disability and nothing more. Those who were not raised or involved in the Deaf community believed that deafness was a disability that needed to be overcome rather than embraced. Along with this, “the sign language” was not recognized as a real language, but just gestures that corresponded with English words (Padden & Humphries, 2005)....   [tags: Deaf culture, Hearing impairment, Sign language]

Powerful Essays
708 words (2 pages)

Deaf Community Definition of "d/Deaf" Essay

- The phrases deaf-mute, deaf and dumb are outdated and no longer acceptable. The majority of deaf individuals have the ability to speak, but choose not to use their voices. It is difficult for them to learn speech when they cannot hear sound, and they simply feel uncomfortable speaking. When we define "deaf", the parameters of the definition should be determined. The audiological definition can be used -- that is, one that focuses on the cause and severity of the hearing loss and whether or not hearing can be used for communication purposes....   [tags: deaf, mute, sign language]

Powerful Essays
1809 words (5.2 pages)

Essay on Deaf Culture

- Deaf Culture In mainstream American society, we tend to approach deafness as a defect. Helen Keller is alleged to have said, "Blindness cuts people off from things; deafness cuts people off from people." (rnib.org) This seems a very accurate description of what Keller's world must have been. We as hearing people tend to pity deaf people, or, if they succeed in the hearing world, admire them for overcoming a severe handicap. We tend to look at signing as an inferior substitute for "real" communication....   [tags: Deaf Sign Language Cultural Essays]

Powerful Essays
1566 words (4.5 pages)