Essay on Comparing Euripedes' The Bacchae and Shakespeare's Henry V

Essay on Comparing Euripedes' The Bacchae and Shakespeare's Henry V

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Euripedes' The Bacchae and Shakespeare's Henry V

 
    In Euripedes' The Bacchae and Shakespeare's Henry V, both writers create the character of a king who faces a challenge. Both young men have newly taken the throne and try to prove themselves as worthy kings. Henry confronts overcoming the reputation of the unconstructive behavior of his youth while Pentheus believes people should respect him as a king simply because he is king. While each man handles his problem with his own measures, Pentheus and Henry both could have dealt with their situations in a more appropriate fashion.

 

Since he spent his youth drinking and carousing, the young King Henry must prove to the people of England that he will serve well as king. When three people of higher social standing conspire with France, he acts appropriately in ordering their execution, stating that, "Touching our person seek we no revenge, / But we our kingdom's safety must so tender," (Shakespeare 2.2.169 - 170). Had Henry shown leniency to these traitors, his actions would have weakened his power to rule, g...

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