Essay about Virginia Woolf's Narrative Technique in A Room of One's Own

Essay about Virginia Woolf's Narrative Technique in A Room of One's Own

Length: 3126 words (8.9 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Powerful Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

 
"Like most uneducated Englishwomen, I like reading." Can these words really belong to Virginia Woolf, an "uneducated Englishwoman" who knew half a dozen languages, who authored a shelf's length of novels and essays, who possessed one of the most rarified literary minds of the twentieth century? Tucked into the back pages of A Room of One's Own, this comment shimmers with Woolf's typically wry and understated sense of humor. She jests, but she means something very serious at the same time: as a reader, she worries about the state of the writer, and particularly the state of the female writer. She worries so much, in fact, that she fills a hundred some pages musing about how her appetite for "books in the bulk" might be satiated in the future by women writers. Her concerns may be those of a reader, but the solution she proffers comes straight from the ethos of an experienced writer. "A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction," Woolf asserts early in her essay. This "one minor point," as she calls it, could have major repercussions for the future of literature. It would certainly, in the least, enrich the life of Virginia Woolf the reader. But before this can happen, Virginia Woolf the writer must demonstrate how a few hundred pounds and some privacy translate into a wealth of new books by women. To do this, she uses a most natural example: A Room of One's Own itself. Before it became a seminal feminist text or the source of countless cultural clichés, this essay was first a piece of writing by a woman of some means and leisure. It is both the result and the purveyor of a set of ideal creative conditions for the female author. Employing an innovative narrative technique, Woolf ...


... middle of paper ...


... and the Languages of Patriarchy. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1987.

McGee, Patrick. "Woolf's Other: The University in Her Eye." Novel: A Forum on Fiction 23 (1990): 229-46. Delony 10

Muller, Herbert J. "Virginia Woolf and Feminine Fiction." Beja 73-84.

Paul, Janis M. The Victorian Heritage of Virqinia Woolf: The External World in Her Novels. Norman: Pilgrim, 1987.

Rosenman, Ellen Bayuk. The Invisible Presence: Virginia Woolf and the Mother-Daughter Relationship. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 1986.

Schwartz, Beth C. "Thinking back Through our Mothers: Virginia Woolf Reads Shakespeare." SLA 58 (1991):  721-46.

Simpson, Catharine R.  Introduction.  Benstock 1-6.

Woolf, Virginia. A Room of One's Own. 1929. New York: Harvest-Harcourt, 1989.

Zwerdling, Alex. Virginia Woolf and the Real World. Los Angeles: U of California P, 1986.

 

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

A Room of One's Own, by Virignia Woolf Essay

- In A Room of One’s Own, Virignia Woolf presents her views evenly and without a readily apparent suggestion of emotion. She treads softly over topics that were considered controversial in order to be taken seriously as an author, woman, and intellectual. Woolf ensures this by the use of humor, rationalization, and finally, through the art of diversion and deflection. By doing this Woolf is able to not alienate her audience but instead create a diplomatic atmosphere, as opposed to one of hostility that would assuredly separate the opinions of much of her audience....   [tags: A Room of One's Own Essays]

Powerful Essays
2164 words (6.2 pages)

Essay on Analysis of Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own

- Analysis of Virginia Woolf’s "A Room of One’s Own" Throughout history, female artists have not been strangers to harsh criticism regarding their artistic works. Some female artists are fortunate to even receive such criticism; many have not achieved success in sharing their works with the world. In Virgina Woolf’s third chapter of her essay “A Room of One’s Own,” Woolf addresses the plight of the woman writer, specifically during the Elizabethan time period of England. Woolf helps the reader appreciate her view on how stifling and difficult this time period was for women and how what little creativity emerged would have been distorted in some way....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Room One's Own Essays]

Powerful Essays
1688 words (4.8 pages)

Virginia Woolf 's Style Of A Room Of One 's Own And Three Guineas Essay

- Virginia Woolf Essay Through her texts, Virginia Woolf is able to challenge the injustices she perceived within her society, yet her arguments endure and encourage her audience to question injustices within their own unique contexts.The audience is able to reach valuable understandings about the way Woolf perceived injustices within her context, a period of change for the roles of women, through the construction, content, and language of A Room of One’s Own and Three Guineas. Both texts aim to challenge ideas and encourage change in the social structures of their individual contexts, yet remain relevant even within the present day....   [tags: Woman, Gender role, Virginia Woolf, Sociology]

Powerful Essays
1149 words (3.3 pages)

Essay on To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

- To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf When speaking of modernism in the work Virginia Woolf, scholars too readily use her innovations in style and technique as the starting point for critical analysis, focusing largely on the ways in which her prose represents a departure from the conventional novel in both style and content. To simply discuss the extent of her unique style, however, is to overlook the role of tradition in her creation of a new literary identity. In To the Lighthouse, Woolf's invention reveals itself instead as a reinvention, a recasting of the conventional through the use of the traditional....   [tags: Lighthouse Virginia Woolf Essays]

Powerful Essays
2170 words (6.2 pages)

Analysis of Mrs. Dalloway by – Virginia Woolf Essay

- Analysis of Mrs. Dalloway by – Virginia Woolf Mrs. Dalloway, published in 1925, is a romantic drama with deep psychological approaching in to the world of urban English society in the summer of 1923, five years after the end of World War I. The book begins in the morning with the arrangements for a party Clarissa Dalloway will give and it ends late in the evening when the guests are all leaving. There are many flashbacks to tell us the past of each character, but it does not leave the range of those few hours....   [tags: Play Woolf MRS Dalloway]

Powerful Essays
1456 words (4.2 pages)

Essay on Virginia Woolf

- Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf was born in London, as the daughter of Julia Jackson Duckworth, a member of the Duckworth publishing family, and Sir Leslie Stephen, a literary critic, a friend of Meredith, Henry James, Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, and George Eliot, and the founder of the Dictionary of National Biography. Leslie Stephen's first wife had been the daughter of the novelist William Makepeace Thackeray. His daughter Laura from the first marriage was institutionalized because of mental retardation....   [tags: Author Writer Biography Woolf]

Free Essays
1700 words (4.9 pages)

The Intersection of External Time and Internal Time in Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

- In Mrs Dalloway, the modernist writer Virginia Woolf undermines the usual conventions of prior prose fiction by adopting an innovative approach to time. She contrasts the objective external time and subjective internal time that structure the plot of the one-day novel. In fact, the story takes place on a single day in June and, by the use of two important techniques, namely the stream of consciousness mode of narration and the interior monologue, the reader is constantly flowing from the present to the past or the future....   [tags: Mrs Dalloway, Virginia Woolf]

Powerful Essays
2726 words (7.8 pages)

Comparing Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights

- Comparing Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights share similarities in many aspects, perhaps most plainly seen in the plots: just as Clarissa marries Richard rather than Peter Walsh in order to secure a comfortable life for herself, Catherine chooses Edgar Linton over Heathcliff in an attempt to wrest both herself and Heathcliff from the squalid lifestyle of Wuthering Heights. However, these two novels also overlap in thematic elements in that both are concerned with the opposing forces of civilization or order and chaos or madness....   [tags: Compare contrast Woolf Bronte Essays]

Powerful Essays
1672 words (4.8 pages)

Narrative Theory in Virgina Woolf's To the Lighthouse Essay

- Beginning, Plot, Sequence, Closure: Teaching To the Lighthouse Narrative theory is extremely useful in teaching modernist fiction; its revival in the beginning of the twentieth century may be a direct response to the practices of modernist fiction. One of the most important components of narrative theory is what I call narrative dynamics, or the related issues of presentation of the story from the choice of beginning point, through the arrangement of linear and nonlinear sequences of events, to the function of the ending....   [tags: To the Lighthouse Essays]

Powerful Essays
1930 words (5.5 pages)

A Room of One’s Own and Modern Fiction Essays

- A Room of One’s Own and Modern Fiction One of the first things to notice about A Room of One’s Own is that it is not a typical lecture. It rambles and flows back and forth, in and out. It is more narrative than logic. It breaks many of the conventions of a formal address. Why does Virginia Woolf choose to do this. Why choose this style, this method. One reason is to turn predominantly masculine, or traditional, thinking on its head in order to undermine its authority. There is another reason for her approach, however—one that rises from her most basic ideas about what literature and writing should be and do....   [tags: Lectures Literature Papers]

Powerful Essays
2674 words (7.6 pages)