Subjectivity in Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth Essay

Subjectivity in Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth Essay

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Subjectivity in Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth

 
   Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth presents an interesting study of the social construction of subjectivity. The Victorian society which Wharton's characters inhabit is defined by a rigid structure of morals and manners in which one's identity is determined by apparent conformity with or transgression of social norms. What is conspicuous about this brand of social identification is its decidedly linguistic nature. In this context, behaviors themselves are rendered as text, and the incessant social appraisal in which the characters of the novel participate is a process of deciphering this script of behavior. People's actions here are read, as it were, according to the unique social grammar of this society. The novel's treatment of this conception of social reading is brought to the fore through its devaluing of written texts in favor of legible behaviors.

 

The novel signals this pattern from its opening. In the first scene we are introduced to Selden, engaged in what we discover is a typical activity for the novel's personae, the silent, personal, interrogation of another person. "If she had appeared to be catching a train," we are told, "he might have inferred that he had come on her in an act of transition between one and another of the country houses which disputed her presenceŠ"(5‹emphases mine). Here, Selden, at his first glimpse of Lily, has taken to conjecturing all manner of explanations for her simple presence in the train station. He, like all members of his social niche, does not shy away from judgement until he is more fully appraised of her situation. Even, the slightest "air of irresolution" gives him license to divert his at...


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...bling Structure of 'Appearances': Representation and Authenticity in The House of Mirth and The Custom of the Country."  Modern Fiction Studies 43.2 (1997): 349-73.

Gerard, Bonnie Lynn.  "From Tea to Chloral: Raising the Dead Lily Bart."  Twentieth Century Literature 44.4 (1998): 409-27.

Howard, Maureen.  "On The House of Mirth."  Raritan 15 (1996): 23 pp.  28 Oct. 2002  <http://proxy.govst.edu:2069/WebZ/FTFETCH>.

Howe, Irving.  Edith Wharton, a Collection of Critical Essays.  Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1962.

Miller, Mandy.  Edith Wharton Page.  19 Nov. 2002    <http://www.Kutztown.edu/faculty/Reagan.Wharton.html>.

Pizer, Donald.  "The Naturalism of Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth."  Twentieth Century Literature 41.2          (1995): 241-8.

Wharton, Edith. The House of Mirth. (1905) New York: Signet,. 1998.

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