Comparing the Powerful Women in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House and Susan Glaspell's Trifles

Comparing the Powerful Women in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House and Susan Glaspell's Trifles

Length: 935 words (2.7 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Comparing the Powerful Women in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House and Susan Glaspell's Trifles

 
   Throughout history, a woman's role is to be an obedient and respectful wife. Her main obligation is to support, serve, and live for her husband and children. In Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House and Susan Glaspell's Trifles, two different women make a decision to take matters into their own hands by doing what they want to do, no matter what the outcome may be and in spite of what society thinks. These two women come from different homes and lead very different lives yet, these two women share similar situations--both are victims, both are seeking individuality, and initially, both women end up alone. There are many ways that Nora and Mrs. Wright differ. First of all, both come from completely different households. Nora's home is "tastefully [. . .] furnished" and always "pleasant"(917). She lives in a lavish home eating macaroons, drinking champagne, and hosting banquets. Nora often has guests at the house and there are even maids to watch her children. Her husband, Torvald, is often home and has guests over. On the other hand, Mrs. Wright's home is unpleasant, in an "abandoned farmhouse"(977) in a secluded area. Mrs. Wright seldom has company, nor does she have any children. She does not leave the house very often and her husband, Mr. Wright, wants no outside interference. Mr. Wright refuses to get a "party telephone"(978) because he enjoys his "peace and quiet"(978). It is obvious that these two women lead different lives with different types of people, yet they share similar situations that are not so obvious.

First of all, both women are "victims" of their controlling husbands. Nora and Mrs. Wright are al...


... middle of paper ...


...ome from different worlds, yet they still share the same type of sadness and pain in their everyday lives. What Nora does is considered courageous in that time in history, where women were not treated as equals and were always looked down on and ignored. Women speaking out and taking matters into their own hands was unheard of and often risky. They want to be independent so they do what they believe is necessary to accomplish and reach their goals, so that they can once again be happy for eternity.

Works Cited

Glaspell, Susan. Trifles. Literature and the Writing Process. Elizabeth Mahan, Susan X Day, and Robert Funk. 6th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice, 2002. 977-986

Ibsen, Henrik. A Doll's House. Literature and the Writing Process. Elizabeth Mahan, Susan X Day, and Robert Funk. 6th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice, 2002. 916-966.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Comparing Men's Assumptions in Susan Glaspell's Trifles and Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

- Men's Assumptions in Trifles and A Doll House There are many similarities in the relationships between men and women in Susan Glaspell's Trifles and Henrik Ibsen's A Doll House. The conflict in each play is the result of incorrect assumptions made by the males of a male-dominated society. The men believe that women focus on trivial matters and are incapable of intelligent thinking, while the women quietly prove the men's assumptions wrong. In the plays Trifles and A Doll House men believe women only focus on trivial matters....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

Better Essays
1274 words (3.6 pages)

Gender Stereotypes in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House and Susan Glaspell's Trifles

- Gender Stereotypes in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House and Susan Glaspell's Trifles In the plays A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, and Trifles, by Susan Glaspell, the male characters propagate stereotypes and make assumptions concerning the female characters. These assumptions deal with the way in which the male characters see the female characters, on a purely stereotypical, gender-related level. The stereotypes and assumptions made in A Doll's House are manifest in the way Torvald Helmer treats his wife, Nora, and in the way Nora acts to please her husband....   [tags: Ibsen Glaspell Trifles Doll House Essays Papers]

Better Essays
1831 words (5.2 pages)

Comparing The Play ' The Glass Menagerie ' And ' A Doll 's House ' Essay

- The unlikely pair of “The Glass Menagerie” by Tennessee Williams and “A Doll House” by Henrik Ibsen do share multiple similarities in their domestic situations and in the things they chose to do. . When comparing these two plays you also have to keep in mind about how that both the plays were done in different time periods. Therefore things are going to be different when it comes to the roles of the women. With the “The Glass Menagerie” and “A Doll House” all the characters have flaws, lived in different time period, felt like they were trapped in ways, and reacted to things differently....   [tags: Henrik Ibsen, A Doll's House, Norway]

Better Essays
1268 words (3.6 pages)

A Doll 's House And Trifles Essay

- The plays, A Doll House and Trifles, brilliantly depict the male dominated relationships that were prominent in each playwright’s society. The play, A Doll House, by Henrik Ibsen, shows how women are seen as nothing more than a pretty face. On the other hand, Trifles, by Susan Glaspell, presents the idea that women are loyal to their husbands so they will do as their husbands wish. The concept of women being viewed as harmless creatures by men because they see them as unintelligent is prominent in both works and serves as the focus of each playwright’s critique of the attitudes toward marriage in their own respective societies....   [tags: Henrik Ibsen, A Doll's House, Problem solving]

Better Essays
1015 words (2.9 pages)

Henrik Isben's A Doll's House Essay

- A Doll’s House, a play by Henrik Ibsen, tells the story of Nora, the wife of Torvald Helmer, who is an adult living as a child, kept as a doll by her husband. She is expected to be content and happy living in the world Torvald has created for her. By studying the play and comparing and contrasting the versions presented in the video and the live performance, one can analyze the different aspects of it. Ibsen’s purpose for writing this piece is to entertain while pointing out an injustice....   [tags: A Doll's House Essays]

Better Essays
1480 words (4.2 pages)

On Ibsen's A Doll's House Essay

- On Ibsen's A Doll's House [This is the text of a lecture delivered, in part, in Liberal Studies 310 at Malaspina University-College, Nanaimo, BC, Canada. References to Ibsen's text are to the translation by James McFarlane and Jens Arup (Oxford: OUP, 1981). This text is in the public domain, released July 2000] For comments or questions, please contact Ian Johnston Those of you who have just read A Doll's House for the first time will, I suspect, have little trouble forming an initial sense of what it is about, and, if past experience is any guide, many of you will quickly reach a consensus that the major thrust of this play has something to do with gender relations in modern society and...   [tags: A Doll's House]

Free Essays
9635 words (27.5 pages)

A Doll's House Essay

- A Doll House Essay Ibsen said that his mission in life was to “Inspire individuals to freedom and independence” which was shown throughout the play A Doll House. Since he wrote modern theatre, the characters were real and audiences could relate to them. He particularly questioned the role of men and women during his time. Ibsen used A Doll House to motivate women so they would seek more power and freedom in their relationships. Audiences could then look up to characters such as Nora and Mrs Linde whom were independent, some what ahead of their times....   [tags: A Doll's House Essays]

Better Essays
1147 words (3.3 pages)

A Doll's House Essay

- A Doll's House The author, Henrik Ibsen, who wrote other social commentary plays (like Ghosts, Enemy Of The People, and Pillars Of Society), made a departure in this plays ending by having the protagonist run away rather than staying to set an example and continuing to struggle for the better along side others. This scenario creates a sad, troubling and for Nora unjustified ending as she, the protagonist in A Doll's House, leaves Torvold, her husband. She destroys any hope that married couples can reconcile differences and learn to change and grow with one another....   [tags: A Doll's House Essays]

Free Essays
2389 words (6.8 pages)

Henrik Isben's A Doll's House Essay

- A Dolls House By Henrik Ibsen Dramatic Critique The P’s Person: Nora, Torvald Helmer’s wife, and mother of Ivar, Bob, and Emmy. Peculiar trait: On the surface Nora’s peculiar trait seems to be her obsession for money. Her internal peculiar trait is that she desires to become significant to her husband. She spends money on material objects to decorate their home and dress up the family. The impression of the home appears perfect, like a doll’s house. Passion: Nora’s passion is to be a real human and not be unreal towards herself, her family, or her husband....   [tags: A Doll's House Essays]

Better Essays
738 words (2.1 pages)

Henrik Isben's A Doll's House Essay example

- A Doll’s House When the play “A Doll’s House” by Henrik Ibsen was first performed, society was much different, and the play shocked many people. Today we don't have quite the same problem, but a deeper look at the "meaning" of the play reveals that it is about problems themselves, not a specific issue. Perhaps a play about gay parenting, internet privacy, or AIDS in the workplace can strike chords of concern in our contemporary audience, and Ibsen's works (perhaps) should be viewed in light of their impact upon social awareness rather than as purely historical pieces....   [tags: A Doll's House Essays]

Free Essays
359 words (1 pages)