Essay on The Civil Rights Movement in the 1950's

Essay on The Civil Rights Movement in the 1950's

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In 1894, the US Supreme Court gave legal consent to state laws
segregating black people and white people with its decision concerning
the Plessey v Ferguson case. The decision stated that black and white
should be separate but equal, meaning the same standard of facilities
for both. In reality it legally enforced a state of affairs that
assured that blacks would never be equal, and couldn’t get equal
treatment, status or opportunity in their own country.

During the Second World War, the black American Gi’s realised that
they were fighting for a democracy abroad, which they did not have at
home. One black soldier vocalised the senselessness of their
situation: “just carve on my tombstone, Here lies a Black man killed
fighting a yellow man for the protection of a white man". Some took up
draft resistance in protest. The refusal to comply with segregation
laws within the military was punished with custody. Returning to
segregation at the end of the war caused the politicisation of many
black Americans. The ensuing civil disobedience campaign, the
non-violent resistance to the law, was one of the catalysts of the
civil rights movement. It was this campaign that was the first to
receive world - wide attention.

One of the first challenges to the Plessey v Ferguson laws was in
1954, when the NAACP contested the right of local school boards to run
segregated schools in the brown v board of education case. The Supreme
Court’s unanimous verdict was that segregation in education would be
illegal. However, by the end of 1956, there were still six southern
states that refused to let black children attend schools with white
children. O...


... middle of paper ...


... In 1955,
Emmett Till was murdered for supposedly “wolf whistling” at a white
woman. The men charged with his murder were acquitted by an all white
jury. This blatant injustice was faced with outrage from the black
community and focused attention on the discrimination and violence
black people had to endure.

The Supreme Court tried to banish segregation in as many places as
possible, due to awareness raised by the Civil Rights movement. 1954
saw the prohibition of segregation in schools and 1956 saw the end of
segregation on busses. In 1957, segregation was outlawed and abolished
completely by the civil rights act, which made all segregation illegal
everywhere. It was still clear that racial hatred existed, but the
movement was fighting against it, and continued to protest and attract
new members to their cause.

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Essay on The Civil Rights Movement in the 1950's

- In 1894, the US Supreme Court gave legal consent to state laws segregating black people and white people with its decision concerning the Plessey v Ferguson case. The decision stated that black and white should be separate but equal, meaning the same standard of facilities for both. In reality it legally enforced a state of affairs that assured that blacks would never be equal, and couldn’t get equal treatment, status or opportunity in their own country. During the Second World War, the black American Gi’s realised that they were fighting for a democracy abroad, which they did not have at home....   [tags: The Civil Rights Movement]

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