Exploring Why the USSR Signed an Agreement with National Socialist Germany Rather than Great Britain and France in August 1939

Exploring Why the USSR Signed an Agreement with National Socialist Germany Rather than Great Britain and France in August 1939

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Exploring Why the USSR Signed an Agreement with National Socialist Germany Rather than Great Britain and France in August 1939


A. Plan of Investigation

As the Great Purges were nearing an end Stalin had gained more freedom
to pursue foreign policy goals, as internal opposition had been dealt
with. In 1939, the USSR was having simultaneous talks of a possible
political military alliance with the British and the French on one
hand and Nazi Germany on the other. This investigation seeks to
determine why Stalin’s Soviet Union chose to side with the Germans,
who’s fascist ideology, was seemingly incompatible with the Soviet
ideology of Communism. Firstly this investigation will seek to
establish Stalin’s foreign policy objectives in the late 1930s, and
then it will go on to determine, why an agreement with Germany was
best suited to fulfill these objectives. The primary time frame that
this investigation will consider will span from the Munich Conference
in September 1938, to the signing of the Nazi-Soviet Pact in August
1939.

Word Count-144 words


B. Summary of Evidence

* In 1936, during an interview Stalin stated that that the USSR does
not have territorial ambitions.[1]

* Excerpts from contemporary Soviet literature[2]:

‘We shall go to the Genghis river,

We will fall in fierce battles,

So from Japan to England,

Brightly can my homeland shine.’

-Pavel Kogan

‘There will be only a Soviet nation

And one – Soviet people.’

-Mikhail Kulchitsky

* In the late 1930s Stalin declared a European War to be inevitable,
‘expecting his country to enter it late and on the winning side’[...


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...ta
Silakalne. Riga: Zvaigzne ABC, 2004. P488.

[6] Ibid, P489.

[7] [7] Vulfson, Mavrik. Baltic Fates. Comp. Emma Bramnika. Ed. Emma
Bramnika. Trans.
Geoff Murrell. Riga: Bota, 2002. P29.

[8] Ibid, P27.

[9] De Jonge, Alex. Stalin and the Shaping of the Soviet Union. New
York: William Morrow, 1986. P360.

[10] Vulfson, Mavrik. Baltic Fates. Comp. Emma Bramnika. Ed. Emma
Bramnika. Trans.
Geoff Murrell. Riga: Bota, 2002. P 53.

[11]Corin, Chris , and Terry Fiehn. Communist Russia Under Lenin and
Stalin.
London: John Murray, 2002. 254-264.

[12] Vulfson, Mavrik. Baltic Fates. Comp. Emma Bramnika. Ed. Emma
Bramnika. Trans.
Geoff Murrell. Riga: Bota, 2002. 27-66.

[13] De Jonge, Alex. Stalin and the Shaping of the Soviet Union. New
York: William Morrow, 1986. P358.

[14] Ibid, P359.

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