The Effects that Love Has on Romeo in Act One and Two and Comparing the Ways that Romeo and Juliet Speak of Love

The Effects that Love Has on Romeo in Act One and Two and Comparing the Ways that Romeo and Juliet Speak of Love

Length: 2463 words (7 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The Effects that Love Has on Romeo in Act One and Two and Comparing the Ways that Romeo and Juliet Speak of Love


When Romeo first enters, he is suffering from lovesickness for
Rosaline. He displays typical signs of Petrarchan love, and throughout
Act One and Act Two, we watch as he suddenly loses his obsession with
Rosaline and develops a passionate desire for Juliet. This is shown by
the way he communicates with the other characters, and by the way the
other characters speak of Romeo in his absence There is evidence in
the language that suggests that Juliet has different ideas about love
than Romeo.

While Lady Montague, Montague and Benvolio are talking of Romeo’s
recent behaviour, from lines 109 – 148, Benvolio speaks of Romeo being
“underneath the grove of sycamore” (line 114), and in Shakespearian
times the sycamore tree represented disappointed lovers. Shakespeare
uses it here to show how upset Romeo was, because his love for
Rosaline wasn’t being returned. When Montague next speaks (lines 124 –
135), he speaks of how Romeo has been seen “Many a morning” in the
woods “With tears augmenting the fresh morning’s dew”. He is talking
about how Romeo was hides himself away in the woods, where he can cry
alone. He carries on to say that when dawn breaks (comparing
dawn-break to the Roman goddess of dawn – Aurora, line 129), Romeo
hides himself away in his room “making himself an artificial night”
(line 133), clearly manifesting his heartache. From this, Romeo could
be said to be very immature still because by hiding away in the woods
during the early mornings, and by creating an “artificial night”
during the day he is being very mel...


... middle of paper ...


..., seems to be marrying for pure love because she says
that she cannot express how happy she is. The last fourteen lines of
that scene amount to an exchange of vows, and are only lacking the
rhyming scheme of a sonnet, although the last couplet is given to the
Friar as he whisks them away to get married.

To conclude, I believe Romeo is affected greatly by love in Act One
and Act Two. He changes from being very miserable and suffering from
Petrarchan love for Rosaline, to obsessive love for Juliet. Romeo
expresses his love with very ornamental language throughout the play,
and it could be said he is making rash, immature decisions. Juliet,
however, expresses her love for Romeo in a far more sensible, down to
earth way. I believe Romeo’s idea of love is more airy-fairy compared
with Juliet’s sensible, more mature ideas.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »