The Role of Nelson Mandela in Ending Apartheid in South Africa Essay

The Role of Nelson Mandela in Ending Apartheid in South Africa Essay

Length: 796 words (2.3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview



Nelson Mandela’s role in bringing Apartheid to an end was very
important, however, there were many other factors that contributed to
the ending of Apartheid.

The African National Congress, also known as the ANC, was a major
factor in ending Apartheid. Even when the ANC became illegal in South
Africa it moved to continue its work against Apartheid. In 1940 Dr.
A. B. Xuma became president of the ANC; he rescued a struggling
organisation. In 1944 he reorganised it, out its finances onto a
secure footing and attracted some able, young, new members who formed
the ANC’s Youth League. These new members consisted of of Nelson
Mandela, Walter Sisulu and Oliver Tambo who all greatly helped bring
Apartheid to an end. By 1848, thanks to the Youth League, the ANC was
ready to give more effective leadership to black resistance than ever
before.

Other black organisations such as the PAC, UDF and COSATU also
contributed to bringing Apartheid to an end. However, these
organisations were not as influential as the ANC of which Mandela was
a member.

There were many individuals who helped to end Apartheid in South
Africa. Together these individuals were extremely important, although
individually Nelson Mandela probably made the most progress. Winnie
Mandela, Mandela’s wife, fought for her husbands release from prison.
She came to symbolise defiance to white rule but in 1989 she was
implicated in the death of a Soweto boy and lost some of her
influence. Archbishop Desmond Tutu spoke out against injustice all
his life. He became an Anglican priest in 1961. In 1984 he won the
Nobel Peace Prize for work against Apartheid. F. W....


... middle of paper ...


... South Africa’s white
government.

Nelson Mandela contributed largely to the ANC; he was a main
individual in the struggle against Apartheid and devoted his life to
fighting for his beliefs. However, I do not believe that Mandela was
the most important factor in ending Apartheid. I think that the mass
protests were extremely important in ending Apartheid and I feel they
were more so than Mandela. Another factor I believe to have been more
influential than Nelson Mandela was the trading boycotts because
without South Africa’s trade market money would become a problem.
Mandela was, though, probably more important than pressure from white
liberals in South Africa and neighbouring states. On the whole
Mandela’s work largely contributed to the end of Apartheid yet I do
not believe he was the most important factor.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Apartheid Of South Africa Essay

- Apartheid in South Africa began in 1948, leading to decades worth of confusion and power control. As an outsider looking in, how did a minority party gain governmental rule over South Africa, leading to years of discriminations and division among their people. Many factors come into play when asking how apartheid even gained momentum. To go back to the basics, Christianity founded its roots in Africa, stemming from many different cultural ideas and wisdoms. Through the art of storytelling, religion spread quickly throughout the continent and rose to be a power for many people....   [tags: South Africa, Nelson Mandela, Africa]

Better Essays
707 words (2 pages)

The Movement Of South Africa Essay

- In 1994, the Anti-Apartheid Movement in South Africa, after three decades of resistance, succeeded in ending an oppressive, unpopular regime in order to make way for South Africa’s first democratic government. The resistance movement to the apartheid system came from multiple sectors of society which joined together to create a coalition of organizations dedicated to the use of strategic nonviolence, peaceful protest, and civil disobedience. Twenty years after its beginning, the movement was faced with a near-constant interplay of passive resistance and armed insurrection that, unlike in some other campaigns, strengthened the protesters and underscored their goals....   [tags: South Africa, Black people, Racial segregation]

Better Essays
1326 words (3.8 pages)

The Role of Nelson Mandela and President De Klerk in Bringing about the End of Apartheid in South Africa

- Apartheid, means "separateness", this was a social system enforced by white minority governments in twentieth-century upon those of ethnic minorities in South Africa. Under apartheid, the black majority was segregated, and was denied political and economic rights equal to those of whites, this had become a distressing daily routine for the Africans. Therefore in 1991 when De Klerk announced the end of Apartheid, this was a momentous moment for the whole of South Africa and an event, which shall be remembered, in black history forever....   [tags: South Africa Mandela Essays]

Better Essays
2232 words (6.4 pages)

A Brief Note On The South African Schools Act Essay

- Apartheid ended, but the country remains unequal. In November 1996, the South African Schools Act, no. 84 was passed. The purpose of the act was to “To provide for a uniform system for the organisation, governance and funding of schools; to amend and repeal certain laws relating to schools; and to provide for matters connected therewith”. The act didn’t fix the issue, the school system remains unequal. According to Nicholas Spall, South Africa has two school systems, one for the privileged and one for the disadvantaged....   [tags: South Africa, Black people, Africa, School]

Better Essays
885 words (2.5 pages)

Essay on Politics and Apartheid in South Africa

- Politics and Apartheid Bloodshot eyes and skin stretched over bones, these people were living skeletons. These people can attribute their misfortune due to the state of politics in South Africa, which was prejudice against dark skinned people ran as rampant as disease and poverty. Due to politics working against dark-skinned people beginning three years after South Africa gained its independence, apartheid was established and fought for by racists and fought by activists until it was ended in 1991....   [tags: discrimintation, skin, laws]

Better Essays
653 words (1.9 pages)

Violence Against Women in South Africa Essay

- Located in the developing country, the Dominican Republic; the United Nations International Research and Training institute for the Advancement of Women (UN-INSTRAW), created by the United Nations in 1976 via recommendation of the First World Conference of Women. INSTRAW is an inter-governmental organization (IGO) whose mission is: “devoted to research, training and knowledge management in partnership with governments, the United Nations System, civil society and academia to achieve gender equality and women’s empowerment.” INSTRAW accomplishes their mission by undertaking action-oriented research from a gender perspective that has a concrete impact on policies, programs and projects....   [tags: women's studies, african studies, gender inequalit]

Better Essays
1591 words (4.5 pages)

Essay about Modern World Study: South Africa

- Modern World Study: South Africa The transition to majority rule in 1994 began with the election in which the ANC won with 62.5%. Nelson Mandela had an important role in the ending of apartheid. As the leader of the MK, he concentrated on sabotage and aimed to avoid loss of life. His release from prison in 1990 did not cease violent riots but the CODESA talks, which resulted in a constitutional agreement for a one-person-one-vote election, gave the ANC a fair chance to change South Africa back to a multi-racial democracy....   [tags: Papers]

Free Essays
904 words (2.6 pages)

Analysis of Global Poverty, Particularly Sub-sahara Africa and South Asia

- The rising of poverty and inequality around the globe has given rise to a number of concerns over the years both national and international levels. The poverty population, according to the World Bank has reached over 1.4 billion, whilst the widening gap of income differentials has reached more than 80% of the world’s population. This chapter highlighted, how both wealth and poverty exists are divided between countries and within countries, the poorest 40% of the world’s population account for only 5% of global income and the richest 20% account 75 percent of world income (United Nations Development Programme, 2007)....   [tags: Economy, Development]

Better Essays
624 words (1.8 pages)

Nelson Mandela is a Worldwide Influence Essay

- Nelson Mandela once said, “There is no passion to be found playing small - in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living.” His life is a prime example of how passionately he believes these words. Even though he had to undergo many hardships, such as spending twenty-seven years in prison and battling tuberculosis, he never stopped striving to make a large impact on not only South Africa, but the world as well (Schoemaker). Nelson Mandela is a major worldwide influence due to his key role in the transformation of South Africa from apartheid to democracy, the numerous charities he established and supported, and his lifelong dedication to ending racial segregation pe...   [tags: south africa, apartheid, freedom]

Better Essays
979 words (2.8 pages)

The Ending of White Minority and Nelson Mandela Essays

- The Ending of White Minority and Nelson Mandela In 1948, the Apartheid system officially started. A Dr. Malan introduced it. He established the structure of Apartheid because he exclaimed different races could not live amongst each other in harmony and needed to live separately. Some might argue it was because he wanted to secure the supposed superiority of the White minority. It ended within 50 year of starting. This essay is going to explain how Nelson Mandela, once just a member of a small Black tribe in the depth of South Africa, fought Apartheid to become a worldwide figurehead for non- Whites, the first Black president of South Africa, in 1994....   [tags: Papers]

Better Essays
1723 words (4.9 pages)