Comparing the Dramatic Presentation of Act 3 Scene 2 in the 1953 Film Version with Shakespeare's Text

Comparing the Dramatic Presentation of Act 3 Scene 2 in the 1953 Film Version with Shakespeare's Text

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Comparing the Dramatic Presentation of Act 3 Scene 2 in the 1953 Film Version with Shakespeare's Text

Julius Caesar was written in 1599 by William Shakespeare (1564-1616).
The play is both a history and tragedy. It was based on Sir Thomas
North's translation of Plutarch's lives.

Julius Caesar has the tell-tale features of a history and tragedy,
such as it being very much based on one leader figure (Julius Caesar)
and having rousing speeches, similar to Shakespeare's 'Henry V' (St.
Crsipin's Day speech). It also includes a battle, although everything
is 'restored' at the end, similar to 'Macbeth'.

Brutus and Antony's speeches are a key element in Julius Caesar. They
are rousing speeches, as mentioned earlier - and very well written.
The techniques used by both characters are distinctly different; they
employ a variety of tactics, which can be interpreted in various ways.
Within this essay, I will be analysing the 1953 film version of the
play, directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz.

Brutus and Antony are both seeking to control the citizens of Rome.
Brutus needs the crowd to support him and believe he killed Julius
Caesar for 'the good of Rome', otherwise there would be chaos and the
citizens would revenge the conspirators. Antony wants the crowd to
support him because he was a faithful friend of Caesar's and decides
to avenge him by stirring the crowd into a mutiny against Brutus and
the conspirators.

In the confusion of the aftermath of Caesar's death, it is decided
that Marcus Brutus will speak at his funeral; the main reason being
his reputation as an honourable and noble senator. This was also the
reason he was led to be a c...


... middle of paper ...


... his fault Antony was kept alive in the first place:
'let us be sacrificers, but not butchers' (2:1:166) It was also
through his misjudgement that Antony got to speak at the funeral -
Brutus trusted him too much: 'you shall not in your funeral speech
blame us' (3:1:245) Ironic as this is exactly what he did.

I think he is the hero because his mistakes lead to his downfall,
though the words Antony says at the end of the play 'restore'
everything at the end such as: 'this was the noblest Roman of them
all' (5:5:68) Also, it is the fact that he genuinely thinks is doing
the right thing to kill Caesar. The other conspirators were more
interested in plotting the murder, but Brutus did manage to do
something for the good of Rome. Ultimately, he was an honourable man;
his only flaw his pride and tendency to be too trusting.

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