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The Concepts of Creation and Nurture in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essay examples

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The Concepts of Creation and Nurture in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

When Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein in 1818 she had lost her own
mother and three children. It is against this background of loss that
many chose to explore the possibility of bringing the dead back to
life. As the daughter of William Galdwin, Mary would have known about
many of the major scientific developments during her days. In
particular she would have known Galvini and his experiment with frogs'
legs, and is likely this motion of electricity was one of the factors
that influenced her choice of the subject. Frankenstein is an
examination of scientific success, but also brings up the question
parental responsibilities, and how important nature and nurture is in
bringing up a child. What Shelley asks are the consequences of taking
a god like role? To answer this we must examine Frankenstein.

In the very first chapter of Frankenstein it begins with an account of
his parents' courtship and marriage and the first views of Victor.

'Broken in spirit'

Mary Shelley's very first description of Victor is described as
discontented. Therefore Mary Shelley uses this very opening to prepare
the reader for the horror to follow in her description of Victors'
despair. Nurturing could also be considered in this chapter where as
Victors' feelings are not taken into account by his parents where then
this is turning point in his life.

As Victor grew older he receives less attention and was not nurtured
as much. He is left to his own devices without much direction from his
parents. When he recalls the moment the event at the age of thirteen
he finds an Agrippa alchemist bo...


... middle of paper ...


...ole.

In Frankenstein Mary Shelley strongly shows that nothing is born bad,
but is the lack of nurture that decides whether a child is brought up
to become either good or evil. This is shown when the creature
discovers how to produce a fire, then nurtures it self that it can be
used to warm itself. However due to the lack of nurturing he uses this
fire for the wrong reasons such as using it to light the cottage. But
the prime example of the concept of creation and nurture Frankenstein
creating an monster, not realising the out come of this ambition to
bring the dead back to life, then also to failing to nurture this
creature and as a result brings unhappiness to this world. Mary
Shelley proves that even though Frankenstein was a scientific success,
he didn't nurture its child hence it is claimed as a parental failure.


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