A Comparison of November, 1806 (Wordsworth) to the Men of Kent (Wordsworth), Drummer Hodge (Hardy), and The Charge of the Light Brigade (Lord Alfred T

A Comparison of November, 1806 (Wordsworth) to the Men of Kent (Wordsworth), Drummer Hodge (Hardy), and The Charge of the Light Brigade (Lord Alfred T

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A Comparison of November, 1806 (Wordsworth) to the Men of Kent (Wordsworth), Drummer Hodge (Hardy), and The Charge of the Light Brigade (Lord Alfred Tennyson)

The themes in November, 1806; To the men of Kent; The Charge of the
Light Brigade; and Drummer Hodge are all war-based. They all contain
the themes of death, war and some sense of victory in that in both of
Wordsworth's poems, it is directly about the victory in a battle. In
Drummer Hodge, it is that his family shall never forget him. In The
Charge of the Light Brigade, it was about the bravery and gallantry of
the British Cavalry.

In The Charge of the Light Brigade, the setting is told in a footnote.
This places it in Balaklava where there was a war going on for
possession of Crimea between Russian forces and the English.

In Drummer Hodge, the setting is in South Africa as it is about a
drummer-boy who has died during the Boer War, which was between the
British and Dutch for the possession of Southern Africa.

To the Men of Kent has no setting but is written about the population
of Kent, Southern England who are asked to protect England from the
threat of invasion across the channel.

November, 1806 is set in Prussia. This is told to us by the footnote
at the bottom of the poem, which tells us that 'The Battle of Jena, on
14th October 1806, resulted in the complete over throw of Prussia by
the French under Napoleon'. The settings of these poems all involve
British me in some way, as it is either the British army ("The Charge
of the Light Brigade" and "Drummer Hodge") or the threat of Britain
being invaded by some one ("To the Men of Kent" and "November, 1806").

In The C...


... middle of paper ...


...ength in words, as it is not just any brow;
it is a 'haughty brow' meaning that it is tough. In line twelve, the
word "parleying" could be referring to the possible threat of invasion
from the French. In line twelve also, the words "Britain is in one
breath" could mean that the "Men of Kent" only have one chance to
defend Britain against the French. This makes the poem more jingoistic
as the British are now putting all their faith in the "men of Kent".

In November, 1806, in line seven, it says 'by our own right hands it
must be wrought' meaning that to do something right, you have to do it
yourself. This could also be referring to the fact that Victorian
society and, in fact, society up until the seventies, believed it
better to be right handed and left-handed children were encouraged to
write with their right hands.

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