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The Importance of the First Amendment Essay

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The Importance of the First Amendment


"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of Religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech," this Amendment is the most important part of the constitution. Without free speech, we the people of the United States would not be able to speak openly and freely about issues that affect our everyday life.

Had it not been for Katie Stanton and Susan B. Anthony exercising their first amendment right to free speech and peaceful assembly, and the press covering and catching the women's suffrage movement it is possible that women may not have gained the legal right to vote until many years later. Many amendments to the Constitution were started by people exercising their first amendment rights, by utilizing the rights to free speech, peaceful assembly and freedom of press.

When people use their first amendment rights effectively, they make people listen and when people listen, change occurs. Many of the laws we have in society today were passed in part by free speech. When people started...


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