Advice to Laertes from Hamlet by William Shakespeare versus Advice to a Young Man by Benjamin Franklin

Advice to Laertes from Hamlet by William Shakespeare versus Advice to a Young Man by Benjamin Franklin

Length: 722 words (2.1 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Good Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Advice to Laertes from Hamlet by William Shakespeare versus Advice to a Young Man by Benjamin Franklin

"I told you so!" This is what my mom would say after giving me advice,
and me not taking her advice. It was so eerie how my mom was always right,
like she knew exactly was going to happen. I'm sure that everyone has gotten
advice at least once in their lifetime, especially from their parents. Elders usually
know what's best for you because they've been through it all themselves at one
time in their lives. That is what "Advice to Laertes" and "Advice to a Young man"
is all about, advice being given from an elder to an inexperienced younger
person. The comparative and contrasting aspects is not immense, but many
points were made on living a successful life.

In "Advice to Laertes," Polonius gives lots of good advice on how to have
a successful life. "...Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue, Nor any
unproportioned thought his act. Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar. " What
Polonius means by this statement is to pay attention to your true self. Also,
before speaking, actually think about what you are going to say. I know I've
made many mistakes in speaking before thinking. I use to make rude
comments like, "Man your really dumb." At least I've learned, to think before
speaking, like Polonius says to Laertes. Polonius advises to be friendly to
others, but not too friendly to people of higher class. He also gives advice on
friends, to know who your friends are, and always keep them close to you. Much
of our times are spent with friends, but don't spend too much time and money on
entertainment, like betting, drinking, etc.. When getting into quarrel, aviod them,
but if you c...


... middle of paper ...


...and how
Polonius' advice will help in life, but not Benjamin Franklin's words. Benjamin
Franklin states, "A single Man has not nearly the Value he would have in the
State of Union. He is an incomplete Animal. He resembles the odd Half of a
pair of Scissors." I am not a man, and I do not feel incomplete without a
significant other, for now that is.

To find happiness, follow the words of those who are wiser then you, for they know
best. If you don't want to hear the nagging words from a wise one saying, "I told you so,"
take to heart to what they say. I've learned a great deal from Shakespeare and Benjamin
Franklin and I hope you did so too. From the words of Polonius, "Farewell. My blessing
seaon this in thee!"



Bibliography:

Advice to Laertes, From Hamlet, William Shakespeare
Advice to a Young Man, Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »