Comparing Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin, Turned by Perkins Gilman and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Comparing Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin, Turned by Perkins Gilman and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

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Comparing Story of an Hour by Kate
Chopin, Turned by Perkins Gilman and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

In recent times I have compared and comprehended three narratives that
are very close to the position of women throughout the early 19th
century up till the late 20th century. They entirely demonstrate the
changes that have taken place over these eras, and how women acquire
the strength to gain their rightful place in society's social circles.
Two of these are brief tales known as, 'Story of an hour' written by
Kate Chopin and 'Turned' by Perkins Gilman. The third of these stories
is an exhilarating romance novel otherwise known as 'Jane Eyre,'
written by Charlotte Bronte, a timeless classic.

Civilisation in these tome periods where very rigorous towards the
issue of marriage and divorce; the community would disapprove and
condemn it very reprehensibly, and factors such as affairs were looked
upon very inhospitably, in addition, these subject matters meant more
when it involved women. (If a man where to have an affair with another
woman it wouldn't be looked upon as harshly, as it would for a woman
in exactly the same circumstances.)

In 'Story of an Hour' Mrs. Mallard portrays a typical role of the
female sex in the Victorian age; her character is based on what I
would describe as emotional anguish, due to her being restrained in
such excessive orders produced by the opposite sex. She goes through
various changes throughout her sentiments before she dies a sudden
death. I say this because, at the beginning of the story, you see Mrs.
Mallard mournfully grieving over her husbands' death; however she then
realizes that she's bett...


... middle of paper ...


...classed far
superior to woman. This is the attitude that leads to a book or an
author being called feminist, as men think, that it is wrong for woman
to be saying or even writing things that deal with these subject
matters. (In a way they can't handle the truth. It may sound a bit
sexist of me to be saying it, but I think that is the actual reality.)

In conclusion, through thoroughly examining all three stories, I think
its fine judgement to say that no; none of these authors and
characters were feminists and that they succeeded in history to take a
small step for woman's rights and place them in the right position for
gaining freedom and independence. By breaking the barriers of partial
and prejudiced laws, womankind have been able to take a leap into the
future, have a say, and that's why we are where we are today.

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