Spectroscopy Essay examples

Spectroscopy Essay examples

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Spectroscopy

Spectroscopy is the study of energy levels in atoms or molecules,
using absorbed or emitted electromagnetic radiation. There are many
categories of spectroscopy eg. Atomic and infrared spectroscopy, which
have numerous uses and are essential in the world of science. When
investigating spectroscopy four parameters have to be considered;
spectral range, spectral bandwidth, spectral sampling and
signal-to-noise ratio, as they describe the capability of a
spectrometer. In the world of spectroscopy there are many employment
and educational opportunities as the interest in spectroscopy and
related products is increasing. However Spectroscopy is not a recent
development, as it has been utilized for many years since Isaac Newton
made the first advances in 1666. Spectroscopy is the study of light as
a function of wavelength that has been emitted, reflected or scattered
from a solid, liquid, or gas.

Fundamentals of Spectroscopy

Spectroscopy is the distribution of electromagnetic energy as a
function of wavelength. Spectrum is basically white light dispersed by
a prism to produce a rainbow of colours; the rainbow is the spectrum
of sunlight refracted through raindrops. All objects with temperatures
above absolute zero emit electromagnetic radiation by virtue of their
warmth alone; this radiation is emitted at increasingly shorter
wavelengths as temperature is increased. Individual atoms can emit and
absorb radiation only at particular wavelengths equal to the changes
between the energy levels in the atom. The spectrum of a given atom
therefore consists of a series of emission or absorption lines. Inner
atomic electrons g...


... middle of paper ...


...a sensitive multielement
inorganic analyses. Mass spectroscopy originated in 1919 by a British
scientist named Francis Aston when a machine was created for the
purpose for measuring the proportions and masses of the atomic species
in part of a sample. A mass spectrometer is an instrument that
measures the masses of individual molecules that have been converted
into ions e.g molecules that have been electrically charged. A Mass
Spectrum is a plot of ion intensity as a function of the ion's
mass-to-charge ratios.

Spectroscopy is a diverse and complex branch of science. It has many
uses and is widely acknowledged as an essential part of development in
the world of science.

A spectrum is an image or distribution of colour of any
electromagnetic radiation arranged in a progressive series according
to wavelength.

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