Poetry by William King, Martyn Lowery, Andrew Marvell, Liz Lochhead, John Cooper Clarke and Elizabeth Jennings

Poetry by William King, Martyn Lowery, Andrew Marvell, Liz Lochhead, John Cooper Clarke and Elizabeth Jennings

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Poetry by William King, Martyn Lowery, Andrew Marvell, Liz Lochhead, John Cooper Clarke and Elizabeth Jennings

Introduction.

The hearts and partners theme contains the following poems:

'The Beggar Woman' by William King (Pre 1900)
'Our Love Now' by Martyn Lowery
'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell (Pre 1900)
'Rapunzstiltskin' by Liz Lochhead
'i wanna be yours' by John Cooper Clarke
'One Flesh' by Elizabeth Jennings

As the title suggests, hearts and partners deals with love and
relationships. In your exam you will be expected to make comparisons
between the different poems and this lesson will help you to make the
connections you need to do this.

Poetic techniques

The hearts and partners selection features an impressive range of
poetic forms from the pop lyric derived 'i wanna be yours' to the
formal rhyming couplets and elaborate arguments of 'To His Coy
Mistress'. 'The Beggar Woman' is a simple narrative told in rhyming
couples, 'Our Love Now' is a free verse dialogue and 'Rapunzstiltskin'
also uses free verse to achieve its effects. 'One Flesh', in contrast
is a formal, rhymed meditation.

The most obvious poetic technique that these poems have in common is
their use of imagery.



Love and Sex
============

Surprisingly, perhaps, the most sexually explicit poems in this
collection are the two older ones: 'The Beggar Woman' and 'To His Coy
Mistress'. Of the modern poems, none of them deal with the sexual side
of a relationship. Three poems, however, deal with the full spectrum
of sexual involvement in relationships. 'To His Coy Mistress' is an
attempt by a young man to persuade a young woma...


... middle of paper ...


...nt.

A fire grown cold

The metaphor in the last line, line 18, seems to sum up the idea that
pervades the poem. The death of passion with the consequent silence
and apparent separation are contained in the metaphor of a fire grown
cold. The speaker adds the thought of herself and her own conception:

Do they know they're old,
These two who are my father and mother
Whose fire from which I came, has now grown cold.

Here the speaker is wondering at the silence and separation of her
parents and pondering on the fact that she was conceived from their 'former
passion'. Look at the rhyme in 'old' and 'cold', and how it links the
concept of old age and lack of passion. The definite nature of this
rhyme is appropriate in a meditative poem in which the speaker has
arrived at some sort of conclusion in her thoughts.

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