Coppola's Adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula Essay

Coppola's Adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula Essay

Length: 1154 words (3.3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Coppola's Adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula

 
   The legendary creature Dracula has mesmerized readers and viewers for nearly a century. In Bram Stoker's masterpiece, Dracula, the infamous monster affects each reader in a different way. Some find the greatest fear to be the sacrilegious nature of his bloodsucking attacks, while others find themselves most afraid of Dracula's shadow-like omnipresent nature. The fascination with Dracula has assimilated into all parts of society. Dracula can now be seen selling breakfast cereals, making appearances on Sesame Street, and on the silver screen. Countless film adaptations of Stoker's original novel have been undertaken by the some of the most skilled directors in Hollywood including, Francis Ford Coppola who completed a film adaptation of Dracula in 1993.

 

In creating his film, Coppola strived to create a film that remained true to Stoker's original creation. In fact, he insisted upon calling the movie Bram Stoker's Dracula, but in reality the movie fell well short of his lofty goals. Coppola realized the complexity of Dracula's character and hoped to combine all of the irresistible qualities that have made him legendary. Coppola however, became too attached to the loving seductive nature of Dracula and neglected the monster's horror. Stoker's original novel centers on the fear Dracula creates and the omnipotent nature of his existence. Dracula only directly appears in the novel a few places. The majority of his existence occurs on a sub textual level, which starkly contrasts the most recent film version.

 

In Coppola's film, Dracula has a very active and visual role in almost every scene. It is quite understandable the temptation Coppola had of showing Dracula a...


... middle of paper ...


... it is not. The movie is simply a vehicle for making money and is not truly a retelling of the original Dracula. The story is not Stoker's and is merely Coppola's representation of what he feels Dracula means to people in the twentieth century. The film has certain aspects of fear but falls drastically short of the fear that exists in Stoker's classic story. The movie will simply be added to the long list of films that have attempted to recapture the magical horror of Stoker's novel but have fallen drastically short.

 

Works Cited

 

Holte, James Craig. Dracula in the Dark: The Dracula Film Adaptations. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1997.

Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Signet, 1992.

Bram Stoker's Dracula. Screenplay by James V. Hart. Dir. Francis Ford Coppola. Perf. Gary Oldman, Winona Ryder, Anthony Hopkins, Keanu Reeves. Columbia Tristar, 1992.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Analysis Of Bram Stoker 's ' Dracula ' Essay

- From the whispers of townsfolk spreading legends and tales of what goes bump in the night to the successful novels, plays and film adaptations, the story of the vampire has remained timeless and admired. One of the main writers responsible for this fame and glory is Bram Stoker with his rendition Dracula, written in 1897. Dracula follows the accounts of Jonathan Harker, Mina Murray, Dr. John Seward, Lucy Westenra, and Dr. Van Helsing, through their journal entries and letters, newspaper articles, and memos....   [tags: Dracula, Mina Harker, Dracula]

Strong Essays
1904 words (5.4 pages)

Essay Discourse in Dracula

- No work of literature is ever written without consideration of the context of the time period of which it was constructed. Dracula, by Bram Stoker, and the film adaptation of the same text by Francis Coppola, differ greatly in attitudes, values and beliefs despite the fact that the film is based on the text. Furthermore, the added embellishments which no doubt make the film more pleasing to the viewer such as increased gore drown out the symbols of values and beliefs conveyed through the individual text....   [tags: Bram Stoker, Novel, Film, Analysis]

Strong Essays
756 words (2.2 pages)

Coppola's Interpretation of Dracula as a Love Story Essay

- Coppola's Interpretation of Dracula as a Love Story       The protagonist and story of Bram Stoker's novel Dracula have been widely interpreted and adapted in films throughout many years. Despite almost a century of time since the initial publication, Dracula has maintained its ability to frighten and mesmerize readers. Francis Ford Coppola's Bram Stoker's Dracula; however, utilizes the erotic romance of the original novel in order to depict a tragic love story. The film accurately follows the general plot of the novel, yet presents the characters in a unique manner that provides for a different appreciation of the characters....   [tags: Movie Film comparison compare contrast]

Strong Essays
1435 words (4.1 pages)

Dracula by Bram Stoker: Modern Man to Enduring Romance Essay example

- In Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Dracula is representative of the superhuman ideal that man is striving to achieve. Dracula is a strong willed, powerful, brilliant masculine figure, and through these characteristics, he appeals to the contemporary reader. By the late 20th and early 21st century, vampires have been transformed into creatures that offer endless happiness and immortality on earth. Such a transformation can be seen in Francis Ford Coppola’s 1992 production of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Instead of viewing the Faustian dream of endless self-gratification and fulfillment as potentially evil, popular culture depicts these satanic creatures as morally justified, and actually good....   [tags: superhuman, power, mina, elizabeta]

Strong Essays
1694 words (4.8 pages)

Bram Stoker's Dracula Meets Hollywood Essay

- Bram Stoker's Dracula Meets Hollywood For more than 100 years, Bram Stoker’s Victorian novel, Dracula, has remained one of the most successful and revered novels ever published. Since its release in 1897, no other literary publication has been the subject of cinematic reproduction as much as Dracula. Dracula has involuntarily become the most media friendly personality of the 20th century. When a novel, such as Dracula, is transformed into a cinematic version, the end product is usually mediocre and provides non-existing justice to the pain staking work endured by the author....   [tags: Film Films Movie Movies]

Strong Essays
4246 words (12.1 pages)

Dracula's Love Story Essay

- Dracula's Love Story Bram Stoker’s Dracula is the title of Francis Ford Coppola’s film adaptation of the classic novel Dracula. Coppola signified that the film would stay with the original plot and theme from the novel by putting the author’s name in the title of the film. However, even though he claims that his film is patterned after the novel, Coppola still could not help but put his own twist on the novel by sensualizing the story and adding a love story between Dracula and Mina. By adding a romantic subplot, Coppola makes the viewers feel sympathy for the evil Dracula when he is finally killed at the hand of his loved one....   [tags: Essays Papers]

Strong Essays
1392 words (4 pages)

Dracula the Impaled Reputation Essay

- Dracula: a name that inspires thoughts of intrigue, fear, romance and in some a life style that is all its own. Yet one thing that is not always known is that there is a true story hidden behind the legend of Dracula. More than one actually, one in which a man is a demon who executes a hundred thousand men, impaling them, and dinning on their blood. Then there is the story of a patriot who cares for his people and is only doing what he must to protect them from the invading armies. The latter of which is less known, yet in the most famous book about Dracula, Bram Stoker brings forth many of the true facts about Vlad Țepeș also known as Vlad the Impaler....   [tags: Character Analysis ]

Strong Essays
1993 words (5.7 pages)

Dracula, Culture And Values From Mediums Essay

- Hollywood in known for making literary adaptations, and such adaptations will exploit context. Movies bring literary properties to the public that otherwise would not bother to read them. However the "marriage" of literature and film holds their own separate qualities. It is precisely the point that Hollywood distorts and corrupts serious literature for the entertainment pleasures of a mass audience. In the task of comparing and contrasting the novel of "Dracula" to film extracts of "Bram Stoker’s Dracula", values, meaning and context discovered lie between discrepancy and similarity....   [tags: Movies Film]

Free Essays
1505 words (4.3 pages)

The Mystery Of Dracula, By Bram Stokers Dracula Essay

- Vampires have long been an icon that challenges the idea of ‘myth’ while also being a perfect example of the term itself. Long before Bram Stokers Dracula, there was Carmella, the lesbian vampire. Before this there were the ancient Greek tales of the Lamia, who are best described by Lawson "....the chief characteristics of the Lamiae, apart from their thirst for blood, are their uncleanliness, their gluttony, and their stupidity" (LAWSON) that would suck the life essence of children. The difference with the vampire, however, is that while other monstrosities of literature and entertainment are considered mostly a natural evil, that is, in and of themselves capable of harm to general human i...   [tags: Dracula, Vampire, Bram Stoker, Dracula]

Strong Essays
1665 words (4.8 pages)

Essay Dracula by Bram Stoker

- Evil never conquers because good always overcomes it. A good example of this is the book Dracula by Bram Stoker because the author expresses the nature of good vs. evil. Dracula wants to come to London because he wants to turn everyone into vampires. The basic background of the book Dracula is when Jonathan Harker, a realtor who is sent to Transylvania to complete a transaction with Dracula so he can come to England. What Harker does not know is that Dracula has a plan for world domination....   [tags: Dracula Bram Stoker Essays]

Strong Essays
1720 words (4.9 pages)