Essay about The Human Condition: Freedom Expropriated by Corporations

Essay about The Human Condition: Freedom Expropriated by Corporations

Length: 888 words (2.5 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The Human Condition: Freedom Expropriated by Corporations


Arendt's ideas in The Human Condition have laid the foundation on which American society is grounded, and are particularly useful for looking at America today. American citizens have been displaced from the Arendtian model of the modern age. The American government has lost its freedom by having been expropriated from the realm of freedom in the vita activa. Capitalism and large corporations now wield the most power and economic influence in America today. This explanation has become increasingly more appropriate in describing the role of oil corporations in America, in light of the actions America has taken since the September 11 terrorist attacks.

 

Freedom, as Arendt perceives it, can only exist in the form of a public space where all citizens, free from the demands of necessity, can come together and actively participate in political discourse. According to Arendt, this notion of freedom has disappeared with the modern age, where world alienation and introspection has led to a society removed from a common world, leaving humans isolated and lonely. America is a testament to Arendt's views, in that such freedom no longer exists. The public realm has vanished; government has degenerated into mere administration, the business of government has become the privilege of the few, and the average American citizen is no longer a participant in the political process.

 

Capitalism in America has removed freedom from the political realm and expropriated politicians from their place in the world. Big business is holding the American government captive with excessive contributions in the form of soft money from political action committees. The 'money chase' des...


... middle of paper ...


...order to further take advantage of the government.

 

Arendt's view of the vita activa, expressed in The Human Condition, can be applied to modern America. The political realm of democracy today has become expropriated from its place in the world, and the displacement of the average citizen in the Arendtian model has left the general public merely as a tool for capitalism to manipulate in order to get its way with the government. This directly opposes the classical ideal of freedom in vita activa and supports Arendt's belief that such a freedom no longer exists in the modern age. Oil corporations have influenced recent American foreign policy towards the Middle East, and the American public has been deceived into believing that they are fighting for freedom, when in fact Americans have been used to pressure the government into taking action in the Middle East.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay about Human Condition As Explored Through Media

- The human condition is the concept which covers the emotions and struggles that man faces during their life. The element of human condition in the texts allows the reader to connect with the text creating another level of interactivity without viewing it at face value. Michael Gows’ play Away was written in 1986 and explores this issue through its array of allusions and thematic concerns. These concepts are further explored in the 2001 film Requiem for a dream which was directed by Darren Aronofsky and in the 2005 short story Chance Traveler by Haruki Murakami....   [tags: Human Condition]

Better Essays
510 words (1.5 pages)

Unbroken By Laura Hillenbrand : Human Condition Essay example

- Randy Pausch once said, “No matter how bad things are, you can always make things worse (Goodreads).” This statement reflects the theme of human conditions that have been encountered by the characters in the novel, Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand. Human condition discusses the idea of the positive and negative aspects of existence as a human being (Dictionary). As Hillenbrand recounts the journey to survival during the World War II of Louie Zamperini, she created an inspiring, non-fiction literature....   [tags: Human, World War II, Human condition]

Better Essays
1675 words (4.8 pages)

Essay on The Human Condition: Existentialism in Literature Relates to Religion

- Noam Chomsky firmly believes that novels, as well as other literary works, peer deeper into humanity than scientific theory ever will (Chomsky). Literature being a means of introspection is known to be true; a solitary manuscript contains the lives of countless characters. Slowly unearthing details, and remaining helpless as a plot twist unfolds, the reader discovers truths of not only those who cannot leave the paper bound prison, but begins to formulate who they are and how the world has warped the author....   [tags: Human Condition, Noam Chomsky]

Better Essays
1002 words (2.9 pages)

Essay about The Human Condition: Contemplation Key to Understanding

- The Human Condition: Contemplation Key to Understanding Ask the average American what the problems facing his country are, and you will get a battery of standard responses. Some people will say health care, others violent crime, and still others will say drugs. There will probably be some who complain of high taxes or express a need for gun control. Certainly, there is evidence to support the fact that these are all issues of great importance. However, these are only superficial, and there is a deeper problem that will not have a simple legislative solution....   [tags: Hannah Arendt Human Condition Essays]

Better Essays
572 words (1.6 pages)

America’s Mergence of Personal and Public Realms in Arendt’s The Human Condition

- America’s Mergence of Personal and Public Realms in Arendt’s The Human Condition America is a superpower, irrefutably the most dominant nation in the world. Underlining this supremacy, however, is the fact that America's society is facing several problems. Among these problems is what Hannah Arendt calls the emergence of society through the mergence of both the personal and public realms. This major problem has spawned numerous other problems, so has been chosen as the underlying cause for the tribulations of modern American society....   [tags: Human Condition]

Better Essays
644 words (1.8 pages)

Essay about The Human Condition: Message Lost in the Capitalist Machine

- The Human Condition: Message Lost in the Capitalist Machine In The Human Condition, by Hannah Arendt, the fundamental qualities of human behavior are described and analyzed. These qualities are first described by discussing the different entities present in the lives of Athenian Greeks. This partition of human life into separate units is supposed to be applied to modern American society as well, however, the structure of today's social order differs from that of ancient Greek. These disparities cause the analysis and ideas projected on the human condition to be contrasting as well....   [tags: Hannah Arendt Human Condition Essays]

Free Essays
991 words (2.8 pages)

Healthcare For All The Human Condition Essay

- Healthcare for All “If you look at the human condition today, not everyone is well fed, has access to good medical care, or the physical basics that provide for a healthy and a happy life.” This quote by Ralph Merkle shows that something so easily taken for granted is healthcare. Most of us wouldn’t even think about it as a privilege, something that has just always been there and always will. In America, we would never even imagine not being able to receive medical care in our times of need, in other countries that is not at all the case....   [tags: Health care, Health, Human rights]

Better Essays
1139 words (3.3 pages)

The Effects Of Progressivism On The Human Condition Essay example

- Many events have been regarded as the biggest mistake in the history of mankind, however, the most unexpected mistake might be the adoption of agriculture. Today, we live completely different lives from the hunter-gatherers of the past. If mankind hadn’t begun the domestication and cultivation of plants and animals over 10,000 years ago, would the human condition be better or worse than it is now. It would be awfully hard to answer the question when compare now to 10,000 years ago. However, the answer becomes clearer when you look back at history when agriculture first came into practice....   [tags: Human, Agriculture, World population]

Better Essays
709 words (2 pages)

Essay on Frankenstein And The Human Condition

- The definition of ‘monstrosity’ and what it means to be ‘monstrous’ can be understood to mean something that is visually unattractive, malformed and/or terrifying. However, monstrosity is not exclusively about something aesthetically ugly, it can also apply to what differs from what is considered ‘normality’. What is ‘normal’ versus what is ‘monstrous’ is closely linked when exploring ideas about the human condition. The representations of monstrosity in Frankenstein and in The Tempest reveal how what is monstrous and what is normal are often found side by side, challenging the idea that it is limited to outcasts who do not ‘fit-in’, and that deep down, a desire to be understood, accepted...   [tags: Meaning of life, Personal life, Human]

Better Essays
1028 words (2.9 pages)

Sin And The Human Condition Essays

- Man has always struggled to find meaning and fulfilment in a broken world. He searches in many places yet each explanation he receives seems to fall short. An explanation for this phenomenon can be found in two specific definitions: one on Sin and one on the Human Condition. These definitions not only lay out why mankind attempts to look for purpose but also explain common reactions to a lack of existence and meaning The definition of Sin in question is “the wilful and deliberate effort to displace God and usurp His authority and prerogatives.” In essence, Sin is rejecting God’s sovereignty over the human life....   [tags: Meaning of life, Human, Philosophy of life]

Better Essays
885 words (2.5 pages)