Not for Ourselves Alone Essay

Not for Ourselves Alone Essay

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Elizabeth Cady Stanton, in an unprecedented movement, raised the concern for the issue of woman's rights. In her day, such matters of "enlightened motherhood", temperance, and abolitionism were seldom taken to heart by the opposite sex. When she spoke at woman's advocacy conventions, anti-feminists and conservative reformers alike censured her. Although her stand on woman's rights was her main interest, it was work in progress toward a larger and more far-fetched goal. Her priorities concerning an idealistic society could be structured as a pyramid. As the foundation, she suggested reform for prisoners and the working class; she opted to eradicate domestic violence against women through the rehabilitation of alcoholic husbands, and not far behind was the proposition for liberal divorce of said husbands. That being accomplished, marital equality and idyllic child-raising would gradually approach her dream of utopia. Mild amendments along the way support her broad tolerance for the modifications in society. Amid suffrage were the theories of eugenics, phrenology, and anticlericalism; her tendency to leap from one unmentionable interest to another left most advocates confused and irritated; some Cady Stanton enthusiasts, however, applied her views to their budding beliefs. Only eighteen years after her death would the closest thing to her dream of utopia be realized: the Nineteenth Amendment granting women the right to vote.

The foundation from which Cady Stanton cultivated her contentions had been the luxury and privilege of her Johnstown home in New York. Inquisitive at eleven, she spent the latter of the evenings in her father Daniel Cady's office, engrossed in his childhood tales, in addition to his court cases and law...


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...litical liberty. Another raised hand and another quizzical mind brought forth ideals, which changed to suit their life and times, to the very issues we undertake today, such as the Republican's crusade to ban late-term abortion. In Mary Wollstonecraft's time, what woman would challenge the Church (and other institutions) as boldly as a man would? Cady Stanton made it a point not only to upset intransigent religious institutions but to hopefully open the eyes of weaker, desperate people seeking a guide.

Soon she abandoned all caution in making public her radical views about marital relations. "A multitude of timid, undeveloped men and women, afraid of priests and politicians, ... are a hindrance rather than a help in any reform." ... forced national recognition of the morality of antislavery with a "thoroughly sifted small group of picked men and women." (64)

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Not for Ourselves Alone Essay

- Elizabeth Cady Stanton, in an unprecedented movement, raised the concern for the issue of woman's rights. In her day, such matters of "enlightened motherhood", temperance, and abolitionism were seldom taken to heart by the opposite sex. When she spoke at woman's advocacy conventions, anti-feminists and conservative reformers alike censured her. Although her stand on woman's rights was her main interest, it was work in progress toward a larger and more far-fetched goal. Her priorities concerning an idealistic society could be structured as a pyramid....   [tags: American History]

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