Comparison of Miracle on St. David's Day by Gillian Clarke and Daffodils by William Wordsworth

Comparison of Miracle on St. David's Day by Gillian Clarke and Daffodils by William Wordsworth

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Comparison of Miracle on St. David's Day by Gillian Clarke and Daffodils by William Wordsworth


'Daffodils' was written by William Wordsworth approximately a century
before 'Miracle on St. David's Day' was written by Gillian Clarke. Due
to this, the poems differ greatly in their style and language.
Observing the poems at first glance, it is obvious that they also
contrast in content, however at greater depth, the connections between
them are made obvious. In this essay, I will be discussing the
connections and differences between the two poems.

The daffodil is the national symbol of Wales; it represents hope, joy
and celebration. Both of the poets make this markedly palpable using
this as a theme for their poems. In 'Miracle on St. David's Day'
daffodils are mentioned at the beginning and end of the poem, carrying
significance as it is they that remind the 'big, dumb labouring manâ?¦'
of a time when he had something to say. The man speaks for the first
time in forty years, reciting the poem 'Daffodils' implying that this
is what he has to say: the joy and hope evoked in him by both the
daffodils that he sees and the poem 'Daffodils'. Wordsworth is less
subtle is his regard of daffodils, his poem is more conspicuous in
portraying the 'fluttering dancing jocund ' daffodils as they fill
his heart with pleasure and this image of the daffodils is the same
throughout the poem.

Both poems depict how it is the daffodils that evoke some form of
emotion in either the author himself, or a character in the poem. In
'Miracle on St. David's Day' the 'yellow and open-mouthed
[daffodils]' and the 'rhythms of the poems' remind him that 'once
he had something to say' and brings him out of his 'dumbness of
misery', w...


... middle of paper ...


... importance of a word or emotion ' I gazed- and gazed ' To gaze
implies to watch with a certain amount of emotion, unlike to simply
look at something. By repeating the word gaze, he emphasises that the
flowers actually meant something to him. Wordsworth also uses
onomatopoeia to allow the reader to visualise the description,
' fluttering ' The word allows the reader to see the daffodils
fluttering, like a butterfly. These descriptive words are often used
in association with a well-known description for example: the
fluttering butterflies.

Having studied both poems in depth, it is clear that they have more
differences than similarities. However, they both have the same
underlying theme of something wonderful happening that should be
treasured, although they have presented this theme differently to the
reader (different setting, characters, topic etc.).

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