Jewish Reactions to the Holocaust: A Learned Behavior Essay

Jewish Reactions to the Holocaust: A Learned Behavior Essay

Length: 1659 words (4.7 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Powerful Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Jewish Reactions to the Holocaust: A Learned Behavior

When thinking of Jewish persecution, images of Nazi Germany, concentration camps, and the Holocaust are most likely to be conjured. Although these images do represent the attempted destruction of the Jews, persecution actually began thousands of years earlier. The Holocaust, or Final Solution, which was the destruction of European Jews by the Nazis, was the culmination of attempts by other groups to eradicate Jews from their society.1 Reacting in many different ways to persecution, the Jewish sect has undergone years of harsh treatment, climaxing during the Holocaust.

Jewish persecution did not begin in Europe with the onset of World War II; rather, anti-Semitism had existed for the past several thousand years. The rise and eventual domination of Christianity resulted in the persecution of the Jews starting in fourth-century Rome and lasting through the Middle Ages, when huge numbers of Jews were massacred during Christian crusades.2 Also, during the Middle Ages, the Christian Church attempted to convert Jews to Christianity. This policy was put into affect in order to ensure that "Christians were ‘protected’ from the ‘harmful’ consequences of intercourse with Jews by rigid laws against intermarriage, by prohibitions of discussions about religious issues, by laws against domicile in common abodes…by burning the Talmud and by barring Jews from public office."3

The second anti-Jewish policy in history is known as expulsion, or the attempt by European countries to force the emigration of Jews during the thirteenth through sixteenth centuries. Jews were no longer being required to convert to Christianity because Christians then thought that "Jews could not be changed, ...


... middle of paper ...


... 13. Dawidowicz, 342-43.

14. Hilberg, 16.

15. Hilberg, 17.

16. Hilberg, 664.

17. Hilberg, 665.

18. Hilberg, 666-67.

19. Dawidowicz, 344.

20. Dawidowicz, 347.

21. Hilberg, 3-4.

Bibliography

- "Anti-Semitism" Encarta Concise Encyclopedia.
http:encarta.msn.com/index/conciseindex/5b105b6f000.htm (26 October
1998).

- Dawidowicz, Lucy S. The War Against The Jews: 1933-1945. New York: Holt, Rinehart and
Winston, 1975.

- Haines, Grove C. and Ross J. S. Hoffman, The Origins and Background of the Second
World War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1943.

- Hilberg, Raul. The Destruction of the European Jews. New York: Harper and Row,
Publishers, 1961.

- Rubenstein, Richard L. and John K. Roth. Approaches to Auschwitz. Atlanta: John Knox
Press, 1987.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Holocaust as One of The Most Heinous Crimes Commited in Human History

- The mere mention of the Holocaust could already arouse eerily suspicious reactions from those who know about it. The idea of systematically slaughtering the Jewish people because of unfounded accusations against their racial inferiority has heaped condemnation against the Holocaust as perhaps one of the most heinous crimes ever committed in human history. Historians would even go as far as asserting that the Holocaust is the most terrible act ever committed against humans, its impact being unparalleled by any other recorded event in human history....   [tags: hitler, nazi party, jewish, WWII]

Powerful Essays
1017 words (2.9 pages)

The And The Jewish Holocaust Essay

- By nature, humans do not want to kill other humans. It is against our way of life and our biology to actively kill another human being. If this is true, then why did the Jewish Holocaust have to happen. If every cell in our body tells us not to kill, why does genocide even happen. The only answer is to make then not human. It is much easier to view people as wide animals if you want an excuse to do something against nature. We take away all of the qualities that humans grow attached, everything that could cloud the emotions against killing....   [tags: Nazi Germany, Adolf Hitler, The Holocaust]

Powerful Essays
1526 words (4.4 pages)

The Jewish Partisans of The Holocaust Essay

- Resistance during the Holocaust, both Jewish and non-Jewish, is a daunting task to cover. Information abounds in relation to this which leads to the problem of putting all of it into one paper. Due to this, I will only cover the specifically Jewish Partisan fighters. The movements are divided into two groups of Eastern and Western Fighters. Partisans fought in almost every European country including but not limited to Belgium, Poland, Russia, France, Italy, Greece, and Lithuania. “A partisan is a member of an organized body of fighters who attack or harass an enemy, especially within occupied territory; a guerrilla.” The Jewish partisans were mostly teenagers, both male and female, of whic...   [tags: Nazi, Jewish]

Powerful Essays
1148 words (3.3 pages)

Different Perspectives of The Jewish Holocaust Essay example

- The Holocaust tends to be a bitter memory and an unpleasant subject to discuss. Although this event took place many years ago, repercussions are still present in the twenty first century. Especially in Germany, the Holocaust not only influences patriotism, but it also influences education and immigration policies. In contrast to other countries where nationalism is common, Germany has been forced to lessen the sense of nationalism in order to dispose false beliefs some individuals have of German racism....   [tags: Holocaust Essays]

Powerful Essays
1631 words (4.7 pages)

Jewish Resistance to the Nzi Holocaust Essay

- Despite all of these internal and external factors contributing to a lack of Jewish resistance to the Holocaust, there was resistance in existence in many forms; the resistance that did occur must not be diminished or overlooked. When considering the definition of “resistance”, historians divide themselves on what this entails; some believe it to be only active, armed resistance attempts, while others define it more liberally. According to Yehuda Bauer, resistance entails “any group action consciously taken in opposition to known or surmised laws, actions, or intentions directed against the Jews by the Germans and their supporters.” Considering resistance with a broad definition such as th...   [tags: Lack Jewish Resistance]

Powerful Essays
935 words (2.7 pages)

Essay on Jewish Resistance to the Holocaust

- Examining any issue pertaining to the Holocaust is accompanied with complexity and the possibility of controversy. This is especially true in dealing with the topic of Jewish resistance to the Holocaust. Historians are often divided on this complex issue, debating issues such as how “resistance” is defined and, in accordance with that definition, how much resistance occurred. According to Michael Marrus, “the very term Jewish resistance suggests a point of view.” Many factors, both internal such as differences in opinion on when or what resistance was appropriate, as well as external, such as the lack of arms with which to revolt, contributed to making resistance, particularly armed resista...   [tags: nazi, jewish resistance]

Powerful Essays
1443 words (4.1 pages)

Jewish Children during the Holocaust Essay example

- ... They were being taken in by strangers and had no idea what was going to happen to their other family. The stress of not knowing if their parents or siblings were even alive was something that they thought about constantly and they always had the agonizing fear that they would get caught and killed. (Hidden Children of the Holocaust). Not only was separation hard for the children, but they were often times killed first. Before the war, there was approximately 1.6 million Jewish children living in the area and by the end of the war at least one million of them were dead (Hidden Children of the Holocaust)....   [tags: Jewish genocide, World War II]

Powerful Essays
1072 words (3.1 pages)

Holocaust: Destruction of the Jewish People Essay example

- The purpose of this paper is to discuss the Jewish Holocaust; The Nazi regime and its collaborators planned the total destruction of the Jewish people. However, during the Holocaust Jews were not the only targets of discrimination. While allied and axis soldiers fought in battlefields, the Nazis waged a war against unarmed people. They killed Russian prisoners of war, communists, Jehovah’s witnesses, gypsies, homosexuals, Serbs, cripples, the mentally Ill, beggars and they killed Jews, an estimated six million Jews....   [tags: world war II, holocaust]

Powerful Essays
1242 words (3.5 pages)

The Holocaust: Non-Jewish Victims Essay

- After Germany lost World War I, it was in a national state of humiliation. Their economy was in the drain, and they had their hands full paying for the reparations from the war. Then a man named Adolf Hitler rose to the position of Chancellor and realized his potential to inspire people to follow. Hitler promised the people of Germany a new age; an age of prosperity with the country back as a superpower in Europe. Hitler had a vision, and this vision was that not only the country be dominant in a political sense, but that his ‘perfect race’, the ‘Aryans,’ would be dominant in a cultural sense....   [tags: The Holocaust: Essays]

Powerful Essays
873 words (2.5 pages)

American Holocaust Essay

- When one looks through the history of the last century, many great atrocities can come to mind. However, the one that is the most common is that of the Holocaust during World War II. People often wonder how something like this could have been allowed to happen. These same people wonder this without realizing that something similar has happened, right within their own shores. Not only this, but they do not realize how previously close we could become to having this happen again. To understand how this could happen again we must first understand how it happened at all....   [tags: American History Jewish Holocaust]

Powerful Essays
1158 words (3.3 pages)