Post Traumatic Stress Disorder In Veterans

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder In Veterans

Length: 1200 words (3.4 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Excellent

Open Document

Essay Preview

More ↓

For more than twenty years, Patricia Dietz, a wife of a Vietnam veteran, has suffered along with her husband the effects of post traumatic stress disorder. She has stated that, "It has changed everything; it has affected the rest of his and her life." Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is when a person is haunted by his memories so badly that it affects not only the rest of his life, but others close to him as well.
Any time there is a traumatic event, physical danger, or threat or personal danger, this disorder is able to appear in ones' life (USA Today Magazine). "A key factor is the persons' response to this event, whether it happens to them or they are witnesses to feelings of intense fear, helplessness, or horror" (USA Today Magazine). "To be classified as PTSD the symptoms must last longer than one month, and usually appear within six months to a year after the event" (USA Today Magazine). Jim Dwyer describes Traumatic memories as "frozen in time, waiting to thaw" (Block, Norris). "PTSD has become a common condition among the armed forces as well as the police, and it has spread throughout society" (Fitzpatrick). "After Vietnam, PTSD appeared and was rapidly taken over from the veterans" (Fitzpatrick).
There are a large number of symptoms of PTSD. The Veterans symptoms can be identical to those symptoms experienced when the actual trauma was occurring (Panzarino). "[symptoms include] May be prone to insomnia, irritability, or outbursts of anger, difficulty concentrating, and an exaggerated startled response when shocked" (USA Today Magazine). Michael Wheeler, a Vietnam veteran, is divorced because of PTSD, he was having thoughts of suicide, he couldn't handle life, he thought he was going crazy (Block, Norris). More symptoms are night terrors (dreams), flashbacks, and recurrent/intrusive thoughts of traumatic events (USA Today Magazine). "Many PTSD sufferers develop depression and anxiety or obsessive/compulsive disorder, in addition to alcohol or drug problems" (USA Today Magazine).
"Of all the Wars in which Americans have fought Vietnam was without a doubt the one in which soldiers experienced the greatest psychological difficulties" (Welsh 58). In the Vietnam war the enemy didn't have a uniform, they could be hidden in with some of your allies this caused a lot of confusion and led to the saying "I wasn't really sure what was going on," and is probably the key reason why there are so many PTSD sufferers (Welsh 58).

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Post Traumatic Stress Disorder In Veterans." 123HelpMe.com. 29 Jan 2020
    <https://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=157526>.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans Essay

- Military service members who are and have been deployed to the middle east show high levels of emotional distress and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Both active duty and reserve component soldiers who have experienced combat have been exposed to high levels of traumatic stress. As a consequence, many have gone on to develop a wide range of mental health problems such as PTSD. “According to researchers, PTSD is a long-term reaction to war-zone exposure that can last up to a few minutes, hours, several weeks, and for some a lifetime.” Common symptoms include: emotional numbing, anxiety, feelings of guilt, and depression....   [tags: Post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD]

Research Papers
2435 words (7 pages)

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder In Veterans Essay

- As with many other diseases, early detection and treatment of mental disorders are key components to rehabilitation and a cure. The prognosis for a better quality of life for veterans suffering with PTSD is increased through early intervention. The VA has developed the Seamless Transition program for the target group of soldiers that served in Iraq and Afghanistan (Currey, 2007). The focus of the program is to deliver the highest level of care in a timely manner, according to Dr. Roswell, M.D. (Currey, 2007)....   [tags: Post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD]

Free Essays
1261 words (3.6 pages)

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans Essay

- This essay discusses Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and its effect on combat soldiers involved in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars. The goal of this paper is to inform others about what the soldiers deal with during and after combat and the different treatments available for them to cope with and hopefully overcome this disorder. PTSD is an anxiety disorder that develops when someone is witness to or experiences a traumatic event. PTSD has specific symptoms resulting from traumatic life threatening experiences....   [tags: Post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD]

Free Essays
1004 words (2.9 pages)

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans Essay

- Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), originally associated with combat, has always been around in some shape or form but it was not until 1980 that it was named Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and became an accredited diagnosis (Rothschild). The fact is PTSD is one of many names for an old problem; that war has always had a severe psychological impact on people in immediate and lasting ways. PTSD has a history that is as long and significant as the world’s war history - thousands of years. Although, the diagnosis has not been around for that long, different names and symptoms of PTSD always have been....   [tags: Post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD]

Research Papers
1656 words (4.7 pages)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Veterans Essay

- Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (commonly known as PTSD) is an important issue associated with military soldiers. The primary focus of this paper will be on the causes of PTSD and the effects it has on returning soldiers from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. I will attempt to elaborate on the soldiers' experiences through my own experiences in combat both in Iraq and Afghanistan. I will explain what PTSD is, look at the history of PTSD, how people get it, and differences of PTSD between men and women, and treatment options....   [tags: PTSD in Military Veterans]

Research Papers
2947 words (8.4 pages)

Essay on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder In Veterans

- For more than twenty years, Patricia Dietz, a wife of a Vietnam veteran, has suffered along with her husband the effects of post traumatic stress disorder. She has stated that, "It has changed everything; it has affected the rest of his and her life." Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is when a person is haunted by his memories so badly that it affects not only the rest of his life, but others close to him as well. Any time there is a traumatic event, physical danger, or threat or personal danger, this disorder is able to appear in ones' life (USA Today Magazine)....   [tags: Post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD]

Free Essays
1200 words (3.4 pages)

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Among Vietnam Veterans Essay

- Recognizing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Among Vietnam Veterans For thousands of year, human beings have been affected by the mental effects of war. In his play, King Henry IV, William Shakespeare included a reference to these mental effects when Percy returned to his wife after the war, “What is’t that takes from thee thy stomach, pleasure, and thy golden sleep?” (Act II, scene iii). Often referred to as shell shock, the thousand yard stare, or war neurosis, these symptoms are now collectively known as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)....   [tags: Posttraumatic stress disorder]

Research Papers
1065 words (3 pages)

Implications of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder for War Veterans Essay

- Implications of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder for War Veterans War is a complex concept that is increasingly difficult to understand, particularly in an age that allows for live images of combat to be beamed around the world. Many war films depict the brutalities of war and affects war has on participants, but it seems that these representations merely skim the surface. The 20th century is an era that saw a significant amount of military action: World Wars I and II, the Cold War, Vietnam, and the Gulf War - millions of men fought, some survived and live among us today....   [tags: Post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD]

Research Papers
1565 words (4.5 pages)

Essay about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in War Veterans

- Military service members who are and have been deployed to the Vietnam war show high levels of emotional distress and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Both active duty and reserve component soldiers who have fought in the war (i.e. experienced combat) have been exposed to high levels of traumatic stress. As a consequence, many have gone on to develop a wide range of mental health problems such as PTSD. “According to researchers, PTSD is a long-term reaction to war-zone exposure that can last up to a few minutes, hours, several weeks, and for some a lifetime.” Common symptoms include: emotional numbing, anxiety, feelings of guilt, and depression....   [tags: Relationships, Mental, Health]

Research Papers
961 words (2.7 pages)

Collateral Damage: Confronting Post-War Realities Essay

- Collateral Damage: Confronting Post-War Realities “Gary,” my Grandfather admitted with tears in his eyes, “I’m going to hell.” 52 years earlier, in the Battle of New Britain, Wiley Ray killed multiple Japanese combatants. The admission stunned my Dad. Growing up, he believed my Grandfather was prematurely relieved of duty due to malaria. That and little else was said of the War. The topic was taboo; any inquiries received the all too familiar chorus of, “Nothing happened to your Daddy, just a hospital bed and pills....   [tags: post traumatic stress disorder, veterans]

Research Papers
1523 words (4.4 pages)

It takes a "trigger" to start a flashback, something to make the person remember their horrible memory, gunshots or planes flying over (USA Today Magazine). Most PSTD Veterans try to remain as far away as possible from these "triggers." These veterans' memories are horrendous, problematic, and devastating (Block, Norris). An anonymous veteran stated "Sometimes, my head starts to replay some of my experiences in Nam. Regardless of what I'd like to think about, it comes creeping in. It's so hard to push back out again. It's old friends, their faces, the ambush, the screams, their faces (tears)… You know, every time I hear a chopper (helicopter) or see a clear unobstructed green tree line, a chill goes down my back; I remember. When I go hiking now, I avoid green areas. I usually stay above timber line. When I walk down the street, I get real uncomfortable with people behind me that I can't see. When I sit, I always try to find a chair with something big and solid directly behind me. I feel most comfortable in the corner of a room, with walls on both sides of me. Loud noises irritate me and sudden movement or noise will make me jump." (Goodwin 4). Michael Wheeler said, "I have constant flashbacks, nightmares …. All the people are killed, dead burnt bodies" (Block, Norris).
PTSD can ruin a veterans' relationship with family and friends. An anonymous veteran stated "My marriage is falling apart, we just don't talk any more" also "I really don't have any friends and I'm pretty particular about who I wasn't as a friend" he also stated "My wife is talking about leaving. I guess it's no big deal. Bit I'm lonely. I really don't have anyone else" (Goodwin 3) "At age 58, Larry Peterson, a disabled Vietnam veteran, thought he would be in prison" (Pettypiece). Many PTSD Vietnam veterans have rage problems. "The veterans rage is frightening to them and to others around them. For no apparent reason, [it seems], many will strike out at whomever is near. Often it is because of a flashback in which the veteran is surrounded by Vietnamese, and the veteran tries to defend himself." (Goodwin 14)
PTSD has not always been known as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. "It was not until World War 1 that specific clinical syndromes came to be associated with combat duty. In prior wars, it was assumed that such casualties were merely manifestations of poor discipline and cowardice."(Goodwin 5). During World War 1 PTSD was called shell shock, because of the high air pressure of the exploding shells was believed to cause psychological damage (Panzarino) (Goodwin 5). During World War 2 PTSD was growing and was referred to as combat fatigue (Panzarino). The Vietnam War changed the whole way people got this PTSD, veterans would not get the disorder until after the war, hence the name Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (Goodwin 6).
There are treatments for PTSD. "The basic tools for the treatment of PTSD are: Individual psychotherapy that is targeted at symptom clusters, Peer group support, and Medication" (Panzarino) Group support is one of the most recommended forms of treatment. "The veteran is usually quite isolated and has lost many of his social skills. He has few contacts with other human beings. The group provides a microcosm in which he can again learn how to interact with other people. It also helps remove the fear, prevalent among these veterans, that each individual veteran is the only individual with these symptoms. In addition, many of the veterans form close support groups of their own outside the therapy sessions; they telephone each other and help each other through particularly problematic episodes. It provides a forum in which veterans troubled by their combat experiences can work their feelings through with other veterans who have had similar conflicts." (Goodwin 19).
There are more Veterans with PTSD from Vietnam than any other war. From being confused about who is on what side to waiting for someone to jump out, Vietnam was one of our worst wars and the brave soldiers who risked their lives have wasted their lives. Not in battle, but with PTSD, for PTSD will never leave many veterans or it has taken a huge chunk out of their lives.


Works Cited

- - -."Non Combat Related Post Traumatic Stress" USA Today Magazine 1 April 1995: 1

Fitzpatrick, Mike. "Doctoring Risk Society: The Home Front" The Lancet 29 March 2003: 1

Pettypiece, Shannon. "Enabling disabled veterans" Crain's Cleveland Business 2 May 2005: 2

Welsh, Douglas. The Vietnam War New York: Gallery Books, 1982.

Block, Melissa and Michele Norris. Radio interview. 25 April 2003

Panzarino, Peter. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. MedicineNet.com. 24 June 2005 http://www.medicinenet.com/posttraumatic_stress_disorder/article.htm

Goodwin, Jim. The Etiology of Combat-Related Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders. DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS. - - - 1987
http://www.trauma-pages.com/goodwin.htm
Return to 123HelpMe.com