Population Ecology vs. Neoinstitutional Theory Essay

Population Ecology vs. Neoinstitutional Theory Essay

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Organization-environment relations depict certain areas of UCSB in their entirety in which two of those theories include population ecology and neoinstitutional theory. Population ecology and neoinstitutional theory looks at UCSB in divergent perspectives: population ecology studies organizations if they are a living or dying species whereas neoinstitutional theory highlights the organization’s importance as an establishment to its field of expertise. With this, I am going to compare both, population ecology and neoinstitutional theory, in relation to the University of California – Santa Barbara. I will further discuss each of their strengths and weaknesses in accordance to the behavior and environment of institution, faculty, staff, and its students within this organization.
Within nature, any form of species focus on selection and adaptation towards their environment to better themselves; organizations exert this idea as a metaphor to personify the organization-environment theory of population ecology underlining any organization functions as a living or dying species. Primarily, population ecology reflects both a rationalist and naturalist perspectives. Population ecology echoes rationalist theory since power is frequently controlled by those in superior positions inside the organization (Taylor 25). Also, population ecology is natural because it denies specificity and predictability due to the organization’s dependence of the fluctuation of environmental resources (Sutton 1/20/11). Ultimately for any organization to adapt and change the future of the establishment, it is compulsory for workers in a dominant position to ruminate any strategies and environmental opportunities and threats (Hannan 930). Henry Yang, as UCSB’s ...


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...rsity. Conformity limits the organization values and appearance to which they cannot change unless the organization wishes to achieve any backlash.
Overall, population ecology and neoinstitutional theory are part of organization-environment relations and are applied throughout UCSB. Population ecology and neoinstitutional theory are two theories describing and affecting the organizational environment at UCSB from two perspectives: the population and institutions as a whole. With population ecology, UCSB faces competition dilemmas to keep their organization from “dying”; and additionally, neoinstitutional theory shows UCSB how to appear legitimate through conforming to society’s beliefs and expectations. Although both concepts are vastly differently, they aid UCSB, as well as other organizations, to understanding the lifespan and appearance of its establishment.

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