Essay about Philosophy: John Locke, David Hume

Essay about Philosophy: John Locke, David Hume

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This is a philosophical question that has been proven ultimately difficult to answer. I believe it is as a result of the complexity of the consent theory. For a theory that places high emphasis on autonomy and freedom, the most obvious basis for legitimate political authority should be some form of voluntary, self-assumed obligation. However, some philosophers such as John Locke and Charles Beitz argue that tacit consent can ground obligation to obey the state’s law while others such as Hanna Pitkin and David Hume counter this argument with the opinion that tacit consent is not sufficient to ground political obligation. Having an obligation simply put, means something one is bound to do for either legal or moral reasons. Therefore, “To have a political obligation is to have a moral duty to obey the laws of one’s country or state”. Theoretically, there are three types of consent; Tacit, Express and Hypothetical and based on the principles of consent theories I don’t support that consent is explains our obligation to obey the law in the practical world. My reasons would be explained constructively in the course of this essay. My plan in this paper is to outline how the different mode of expression of consent is insufficient in explaining our obligation to obey the state’s law by interpreting and evaluating the defects of the types of consent. I shall aim to show that actual consent theories cannot be made to work, because there are no common grounds of actual consent to obey the law. Although most people assume that their obligation to obey the states laws is explained by a practical basis of their consent, I say, if people morally agree with the laws of the state they obey it. Consent theories do not necessarily explain the motive ...


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... voter’s intention as expressed by their vote makes their vote meaningless as a form of consent. It could also be that false promises were made to citizens by participants of the election and so these “potential consenter” were misled. It cannot then be that voting for a supposed legit government who acts contrary to what they promised shows that by voting, people consent to the lies they know nothing about. Once again this does not correlate with the conditions of John Simmons of making the potential consenter aware of what they are consenting to.

CONCLUSION
To conclude, I do not agree that voting and staying in the country are plausible. They do not satisfy the conditions of consent theory. I believe that if there is an absence of free choice for potential consenters, there is an absence of any possible explanation to have an obligation to obey the law.








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