The People Of The Ohio Essay

The People Of The Ohio Essay

Length: 1329 words (3.8 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

On September 12, 1813, Ohio governor Return J. Meigs wrote a proclamation to the people of the Ohio, addressing a hostile crises situation, regarding Indians who had been attacking locals. A number of Delaware Indian families had recently become under the protection of the United States, as well as Indian chiefs and warriors who sought to join the N. W. army. Among these families, there were some who sought to attack the American settlers, and carried out murders of some Ohio inhabitants. As a result, there had developed an “indiscriminate vengeance” towards the native people. Furthermore, the natives that were carrying out these attacks were believe to be sent by the British government with the intentions of “…carrying into effect the insidious policy of promoting discord between the frontier inhabitants of Ohio and the neighboring Indians by sending their hostile Indians to commit murders in those neighborhoods, settlements and places where such murders would be likely…”.
According to Governor Meigs, British forces were doing everything in their power to keep the American settlers at war with the Indian tribes. In an effort to control the hostile situation, as well as honoring the treaties made with the tribes, he urged the citizens of Ohio to do everything in their power to discover those individuals responsible for the murderous crimes, and bring them to justice. He further warned the citizens “against acts of indiscriminant revenge – that they take not justice into their own hands and violate not the sanctity of treaties”. At the end of his address, he makes very clear that he will do what he can to hold those responsible, while at the same time asking citizens not to take matters in their own hands, in a desperate effort ...


... middle of paper ...


...ument could serve as a resource for historians who want to explore British and native relations during the War of 1812, as well as the changing views towards native peoples in the post-colonial era. It provides an individual perspective on a process of warfare in a larger region inhabited by multiple cultures.




















Bibliography


MEIGS, RETURN J. "The Friendly Indians." Weekly Register (October 3, 1813): 86. American
Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection: Series 1, EBSCOhost. Accessed September 28, 2015.

Meigs, Rick. “Return Johnathan Meigs 2nd. Meigs Family History and Genealogy. Web.
Accessed October 3, 2015. www.meigs.org.

Snyder, Christina. Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America.
66-80. Harvard: President and Fellows of Harvard College c. 2010. First Harvard University Press, 2012.


Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on The Legacy Of Columbus, Ohio

- Your Title Columbus, Ohio is a well-known capital city often frequented by enthusiastic tourist or rival spectators who become entranced in the overwhelming atmosphere often associated with the Ohio State Buckeyes; the 2015 nationally undisputed college football champions. Also, Columbus is home to the other easily recognized sports teams, restaurants, and other points of interest, such as: the Columbus Blue Jackets, Franklin Park Conservatory, and Thurman’s Grill just to name a few. Naturally, Columbus, Ohio would appear to be a desired utopia to visit, if not build a life filled with children and white picket fences....   [tags: Crime, Gang, Columbus, Ohio]

Strong Essays
1259 words (3.6 pages)

Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson Essay

- Despite the fact that there are people who simply do not want to communicate with others, there are those who do not think or know that there are institutions that they can reach out to for help. In the novel Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson, each character sees the world with a different perception of what life should be like, often a distorted perception, and their neurosis is caused by the isolation of the small town. Neurosis is the term for the distress of the mind causing a person to behave socially different from others; it is also seen as abnormal nature....   [tags: Anderson Winesburg Ohio]

Free Essays
1628 words (4.7 pages)

Essay on Fading Away in Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio

-       The final sentence of Winesburg, Ohio imprints the image of the town fading away as George Willard departs for the city. In fact, to view the novel in larger units, the final chapter is conspicuously named "Departure," and for any reader who bothers to take in the table of contents page before starting the book it is fairly easy to deduce how Winesburg, Ohio will end before it even begins. The notion of escape from the town of Winesburg is common throughout the book, and the intended destination for escape is usually some undefined "city." As a recurring element, however, it fits into a broader theme of the novel, that of a need for change in general....   [tags: Anderson Winesburg Ohio Essays]

Strong Essays
2088 words (6 pages)

Essay on Hollow Words in Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio

- Hollow Words in Winesburg, Ohio       Sherwood Anderson, in his masterpiece Winesburg, Ohio was writing against the notion that stories have to have a plot which reveals a moral idea or conclusion. Like the "tales" that Doctor Parcival tells George Willard in "The Philosopher," Anderson's short stories also seem to "begin nowhere and end nowhere" (51). We as readers must, like George Willard, decide if such stories are little more than "a pack of lies" or if rather, "they contain the very essence of truth" (51)....   [tags: Anderson Winesburg Ohio Essays]

Strong Essays
1876 words (5.4 pages)

Essay on Isolation in Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio

- Isolation in Winesburg, Ohio       Winesburg, Ohio is a story of lost or nonexistent connections with other human beings. Every character throughout the text has a want, a need, to connect with someone or something. Each individual faces a life of isolation. In most cases the solitary nature of their lives is self-inflicted. This self-punishment seems to be the outcome of a deeply personal hatred towards the characters' perceived differences with the rest of the Winesburg population. This is the fact that elevates Winesburg, Ohio above the rest....   [tags: Anderson Winesburg Ohio Essays]

Strong Essays
788 words (2.3 pages)

Isolation in Winesburg Ohio and Death in The Woods Essay

- Isolation in Winesburg Ohio and Death in The Woods In 1919, Sherwood Anderson composed his work Winesburg Ohio, which depicts the inner lives of small-town America. Anderson’s fascination to explore what’s beneath the surface of human lives results in another story in 1933 called “Death In The Woods”. These two works, incidentally, share a common theme of isolation. The characters in these works, are portrayed as “grotesques” or people who live their lives by one truth, thus living a life of falsehood and isolation from the rest of the world....   [tags: Winesburg Ohio Death Woods Essays]

Strong Essays
2170 words (6.2 pages)

Essay on The Many Themes in Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio

- The Many Themes in Winesburg, Ohio Winesburg, Ohio is a compilation of short tales written by Sherwood Anderson and published as a whole in 1919. The short tales formulate the common themes for the novel as follows: isolation and loneliness, discovery, inhibition, and cultural failure. In order to examine these themes, Anderson's history must be understood and examined to provide illumination upon why Anderson came to such beliefs about human life. Sherwood Anderson was born on September 13, 1876, in Camden, Ohio....   [tags: Anderson Winesburg Ohio Essays]

Strong Essays
1456 words (4.2 pages)

Essay on Language and Mores in Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio

- Language and Mores in winesburg, ohio Language and literature lead parallel lives. What changes most often and most dramatically is the language we use to describe events and feelings that are common to all times. Language shifts, stretches, adopts, and absorbs -- it drops antiquated terms and picks up a few new ones, and you don't have to look far to find novels and short stories grown stale from shaky, outdated prose, from too many neo-tropisms, catch-phrases, and slang with a short shelf-life....   [tags: Anderson Winesburg Ohio Essays]

Strong Essays
1165 words (3.3 pages)

Essay on An Analysis of Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio

- An Analysis of Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio Under the guise of simplicity, Sherwood Anderson weaves an intricate tale of man's struggle for understanding and love in Winesburg, Ohio. Against a backdrop rich with symbolism, he examines man's truths crumbling behind the walls he has built. Anderson employs a strong use of symbolism in "Adventure." Waiting in vain for a self-made fantasy to realize, Alice Hindman sacrifices a meaningful life within society. Alice's "outward existence appears to run steadily downhill into dull meaninglessness, her inward life climbs with increasing intensity toward a climax of desperation and hysteria" (Joselyn 450)....   [tags: Anderson Winesburg Ohio Essays]

Strong Essays
2012 words (5.7 pages)

Ohio Essay

- Ohio This country has had many riots throughout its history. The mid-sixties till the early seventies were a popular time for these riots. Many people were experimenting with drugs and the overall environment was such a way that will never be felt again. From all these riots, one in particular at Kent State left four people dead. This event was so influential that Neil Young (At this time a part of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young) wrote a song called "Ohio". Before someone can start explaining the significance of the song to the event, one should describe the situation itself....   [tags: Papers]

Free Essays
984 words (2.8 pages)