Peace of Westphalia Essay

Peace of Westphalia Essay

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The signing of the Peace of Westphalia brought an end to the long a bloody Thirty Years War that ravaged Germany for three decades. The treaty was signed in 1648 and it offered a freedom of religion that was not offered in the Peace of Augsburg. This treaty also took power away from the Church and it would never again be allowed to be the dominant power in Europe.2 The German Princes could finally have control over their country without the Catholic Church.3
The problem began with the Peace of Augsburg. The Peace of Augsburg in 1555 granted the princes of each country the choice to decide which religion their territory would choose. The attempt of the Peace of Augsburg was to bring peace and tolerance between Protestants and Catholics. However, the Peace of Augsburg slowly faded into tension for several reasons. The people were unhappy because they did not have the religious freedom given to the Princes. The Rulers were unhappy because many Protestants, meaning those other than Lutheran, were still considered to be heretics.4 Also, the Catholic-counter reformation in Germany began...

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