The Novel 1984 by George Orwell Essay

The Novel 1984 by George Orwell Essay

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1984, Orwell’s last and perhaps greatest work, deals with drastically heavy themes that still terrify his audience after 65 years. George Orwell’s story exemplifies excessive power, repression, surveillance, and manipulation in his strange, troubling dystopia full of alarming secrets that point the finger at totalitarian governments and mankind as a whole. What is even more disquieting is that 1984, previously considered science fiction, has in so many ways become a recognizable reality.
Orwell uses Winston Smith, our main character, to exemplify the message he repeatedly tries to get across. Winston is a middle-aged man who is alone, or so it seems. It quickly becomes clear through his awkward behavior that he is constantly being monitored, whether he is at work, watching television, or even asleep. He is forced to tell lies by the ruling party of his country (Oceania) when writing news articles for his job so that the ruling party is always glorified, and its opponents criticized. He must rewrite history so that the ruling party, represented by the all knowing figure Big Brother, becomes the ultimate good superpower of the past, present and future. “He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past,” (35). Winston is completely restrained and forced to do the bidding of the party, as is everyone else. The novel really commences when Winston starts to realize something no one else can see. He starts to understand that he is controlled in every way possible, and this discovery swiftly changes him. He turns into a rebel, a silent instigator of a revolution against the oppressive regime, along with newfound comrades. As his rebellion grows, he finds horrifying secrets hidden by the Party t...


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... is still a well made thriller, always keeping you on the edge of your seat, scared that Winston will be found out in his illegal activities. This is all for a reason. George Orwell’s work was really a warning call, a cautionary tale, and one he wanted everyone to hear. That is why an intriguing story, tools for the reader to think about what they read, and an example for where society could be headed were all included in this novel.
George Orwell definitely succeeded in this masterful piece, a book which will be remembered for years to come, a book which has reached millions and enlightened all of them. This book must be read by people everywhere, so that they can understand the dangers of surveillance, manipulation, and complete control and trust in one regime, so that they can stop any traces of an all powerful totalitarian nation or even a totalitarian world.



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