Essay on Not A Word, Not A Sound

Essay on Not A Word, Not A Sound

Length: 658 words (1.9 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Not A Word, Not A Sound
Imagine walking through a forest. Upon walking, you spot a man about to jump into a lake as if there was no tomorrow. You run and open your mouth to shout, “NO! STOP! DON’T JUMP!” But as you desperately try to call out, not a word, not a sound comes out of your mouth. All you hear is the sound of the wind rustling through the trees and almost instantly, the sound of the man’s body penetrating into the water is heard...then nothing but the sound of your own heartbeat beating through the silence.
Voice is one of the greatest gifts given to us since birth. And although many of us have the privilege of being blessed with this wonderful gift, there are those who unfortunately don’t posses this gift because either they weren’t born with voice or lost their gift sometime of their lives. Their tragic fate has led them to live a life without a voice, unable to speak or make sound come out of their mouths. They aren’t able to enjoy the amazing power and joy experienced by those blessed with voice.
What are these amazing powers and joys, one may ask? The ability to...

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay about The Musical Sound Of Hoof Beats

- “The idea is to write it so that people hear it and it slides through the brain and goes straight to the heart.” Maya Angelou an American poet, memoirist, and civil rights activist penned these words; consequently, she expressed exactly how I like to write. I do not endeavor for my writing to only be smooth and polished; rather, I would prefer my writing to reach deep within the souls of the readers so that they find themselves living my words rather than merely reading them. I have discovered that in order to accomplish this task I should assess my strengths and their benefits, also my weaknesses and what I can do to improve....   [tags: Sentence, Question, Learning, Word]

Better Essays
843 words (2.4 pages)

Making Sense Of The Spoken Word Essay example

- Making sense of the spoken word is a task that we accomplish every day, most times without any thoughts or efforts. Nevertheless, we go about our daily activity talking to the people around us with the assumption that they will comprehend what we are saying and, in return, we will reciprocate and understand their spoken words. But what if we were dropped into a world where we did not know the language and we must learn to communicate or die; so it is with babies, every day new babies are born not knowing the language spoken around them....   [tags: Language, Word, Languages, Reason]

Better Essays
816 words (2.3 pages)

A Short Note On The Elements Of Sound Essay

- Poetry Often times I read a poem to myself silently and find it hard to understand the significance of the point that the author is trying to establish. It is when that poem is read aloud that it really begins to shine and bring feeling to a work of art (823). The elements of sound are what make a poem come to life and provoke thought in the readers mind so that the author and reader make a connection. Whether it is creating flow, provoking immersive images, or creating suspense, elements of sound like alliteration, onomatopoeia, and rime strengthen the meaning of a poem in ways that you could never fully experience when reading silently....   [tags: Edgar Allan Poe, Poetry, Sound, Annabel Lee]

Better Essays
1028 words (2.9 pages)

The Sound and the Fury Essay

- The Sound and the Fury: Chronology of Despair Three little boys watch wearily and fearfully as their sister shimmies quickly up a tree to peer through the window of a dilapidated Southern farmhouse. Our attention focuses neither on her reaction to the festivities commencing in the house, nor on the danger suspended nervously in the dusky air as the tiny image worms up the tree trunk. Sensing the distress apparent in the boys’ words and actions, our eyes rivet to the same thing that fills their faces with apprehension—the dark and muddied stain of filth firmly planted on the bottom of the little girl’s underpants....   [tags: Sound Fury]

Better Essays
6984 words (20 pages)

Usage Of The Word At Times And At The Right Time Essay

- For any writer there is times that we can 't choose the right word at times and at the last second we choose a word that seems right but it 's in the wrong context. As result, it leaves a wrong meaning to what we are writing. Well the problem is the usage of the "exact words" at the right time. The usage of the exact words helps the writer choose from a variety of words that help clarify or state the writer 's true meaning of his or her writing. Exact words comes in many different forms to help the writer from narrowing down specific words to the careful usage of figure of speech....   [tags: Writing, Writer, Meaning of life, Word]

Better Essays
848 words (2.4 pages)

Sanity and Insanity in Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury Essay

- Sanity and Insanity in Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury Quentin Compson, the oldest son of the Compson family in William Faulkner's novel, The Sound and the Fury, personifies all the key elements of insanity. Taking place in the imaginary town of Jefferson, Mississippi, the once high class and wealthy Compson family is beginning their downfall. Employing a stream of consciousness technique narrated from four points of view, Benjy, the "idiot child," Jason the cruel liar, cheat, and misogynist, Quentin the introvert, and the author narrating as a detached observer, Faulkner creates the situation of a completely dysfunctional family....   [tags: Faulkner Sound and the Fury Essays]

Free Essays
1202 words (3.4 pages)

William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury Essay

- William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury In William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, the image of honeysuckle is used repeatedly to reflect Quentin’s preoccupation with Caddy’s sexuality. Throughout the Quentin section of Faulkner’s work, the image of honeysuckle arises in conjunction with the loss of Caddy’s virginity and Quentin’s anxiety over this loss. The particular construction of this image is unique and important to the work in that Quentin himself understands that the honeysuckle is a symbol for Caddy’s sexuality....   [tags: Faulkner Sound Fury Essays]

Better Essays
1595 words (4.6 pages)

Critiques of Faulkner’s Sound and Fury Essay

- Critiques of Faulkner’s Sound and Fury After reading through a large chunk of criticism, it seems clear to me how David Minter, editor of our edition, hopes to direct the readers’ attentions. I was rather dumbstruck by the number of essays included in the criticism of this edition that felt compelled to discuss Faulkner and the writing of The Sound and the Fury seemingly more than to discuss the text itself. Upon going back over the essay, I realized that Minter’s own contribution, “Faulkner, Childhood, and the Making of The Sound and the Fury,” is a prime example of such “criticism of the text” that focuses on the author, his creation of the text as a process, and the author’s self-profes...   [tags: Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury]

Better Essays
864 words (2.5 pages)

Analysis of Memory and Time in Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury Essay

- Sartre and Brooks’ Literary Critiques: Analysis of Memory and Time in Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury “History is the witness that testifies to the passing of time.” Cicero presaged the study of historical memory and conceptions of time, which assumes that what and how we remember molds our past into something more than a chronological succession of events. Ever more appreciative of the subjectivity of recollection, we grasp that without memory, time passes away as little more than sterile chronology....   [tags: Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury]

Better Essays
929 words (2.7 pages)

Sound Essays

- Basis of Processing Sound Strategies Introduction to Coding Strategies: D.J. Allum Coding strategies define the way in which acoustic sounds in our world are transformed into electrical signals that we can understand in our brain. The normal-hearing person already has a way to code acoustic sounds when the inner ear (cochlear) is functioning. The cochlea is the sensory organ that transforms acoustic signals into electrical signals. However, a deaf person does not have a functioning cochlea. The cochlear implant takes over its function....   [tags: essays research papers]

Free Essays
1810 words (5.2 pages)