The New Woman By Bram Stoker Essay

The New Woman By Bram Stoker Essay

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The New Woman is a term which describes the rise of feminist power and status within the Victorian Era. The new woman opposes all acts of the traditional woman and is a female who fights for equality and status, and her own happiness. The traditional woman is someone who is controlled by her husband and children and keeps the living style well kept within the home, but has no other power or responsibilities outside of the home. In the novel “Dracula”, by Bram Stoker, Stoker’s view and support of the new women is not clearly presented because of the mix traits he has within his main female characters. Stoker presented his character Mina with traits that represent the new woman, but on the other hand he also included a character Lucy which is all for and represents the traditional woman. This mix in characters makes it unclear in which he supports or doesn’t support the ways of the new woman and the traditional woman. Similar to Stoker, in the poem “The Goblin Market” by Christina Rossetti, the support of the new woman seems to be present but seems to be contradicted with the events that occur throughout the rest of the poem. On one hand the character Laura seems to represent the new women where she goes and fends for the forbidden fruit, on the other hand she seems to have been punished. Then again the author introduces the traits of the new woman with her sister Lizzie which fends and fought off the goblins in order to rescue her sister. Ultimately, in these two text it is not determined if the authors are in support or unsupportive of the new women because of the mixture of events and traits that occurs within these literature pieces.
In the novel, Dracula by Bram Stoker, the visualization of the new woman is truly undetermined...


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...n place. Laura seem to have represented the new women because she is is able to pursue her sexual desires without caring about society 's view on her. In this instance she represented the new women, but then the author seems to contradict and becomes unsupportive of the new women by punishing Laura for eating the forbidden fruit. Laura’s sister Lizzie explains her sister 's condition as, “Till Laura dwindling Seem’d knocking at Death’s door” (..). Laura being the new women at this point of the poem was punished and came close to the edge of death, perhaps indicating that Rossetti wants to punish those who pursue the acts of the new women. Rossetti then returned the traits of the new women within the character Lizzie, having her venture out and face the goblin men alone. Lizzie then does not give into the horrors of these man and remained strong to recieve the fruit.

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