Essay about The New Suffragists

Essay about The New Suffragists

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The battle for suffrage was a long and slow process. Many women tried to initiate the fight for suffrage, like Alice Paul and Lucy Burns. “These were the New Suffragists: women who were better educated, more career-oriented, younger, less apt to be married and more cosmopolitan than their previous generation.” (pg 17) Eventually, in 1920, the 19th amendment was ratified; allowing women to vote, but it was not any one person or event that achieved this great feat. It was the confluence of certain necessary factors, the picketing and parades led by Alice Paul, militaristic suffrage parties and the influence of the media that caused the suffrage amendment to be passed and ratified in 1920. But most importantly, they successfully moved both President Wilson and Congress to support and pass a federal suffrage amendment.
“Among the New Suffragists, militancy was the chief weapon… No longer would they beg for their rights. They would henceforth, demand them.” (pg 17) Alice Paul and Lucy Burns would meet again and would discuss proposals to shift the NAWSA’s strategy to emphasize a federal campaign for a constitutional amendment. They were convinced that it promised the quickest route to national suffrage. Their strategy was on holding the national political parties responsible for failure to pass an amendment. If the Democratic Party members of Congress failed to pass a federal amendment, then they should be accountable next election.
NAWSA agreed to let Paul to organize a large suffrage parade in Washington DC, scheduled for the day of Wilson’s inauguration. Holding the parade on this date would receive mass media recognition and publicity to spread their cause. By 1913 Paul and Burns were recruiting more members for the Congressio...


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...e was tallied on June 4, the Senate passed the amendment by a vote of 56-24. The ratification process took fifteen months to accomplish. On August 26, 1920, the Secretary of State signed the official proclamation for the Nineteenth Amendment.
After years upon years the 19th amendment was approved; giving women the right to vote, but it was not any one person or event that achieved this great feat. It was the confluence of certain necessary factors of consent parades, fundraisers; picketing and lobbying the new suffragists were able to meet their goal of a federal amendment. The new suffragist’s constant pressure turned Wilson and Congress from not knowing about this movement to supporting it. The new suffragists did everything possible to get what they wanted and they achieved it by being determined and well organized by key leaders like Alice Paul and Lucy Burns.

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