Essay on The Nature Of The Dharma Realm

Essay on The Nature Of The Dharma Realm

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If one wishes to fully understand
All Buddhas of the past, present, and future,
One should contemplate the nature of the Dharma Realm:
Everything is only a creation of the mind.



“Who and what am I?” “Why do I exist?” Each of us, during some part of our life, wonders about these questions. While we are aware of our own being, we don’t actually know how or why we came to be. Our existence poses a great mystery. Our views of who we are and why we’re here, consciously or unconsciously, affect every moment of our lives. The Buddha was both troubled and fascinated by these questions. He was troubled, in that life unexamined, unsolved seemed meaningless; he was fascinated, in that the solution to this deep riddle was accessible, within reach, almost beckoning.

The teaching of the Buddha, known as the Dharma, grew out of his personal discovery, his awakening to “things as they really are.” Indeed, the word Dharma literally translated is “law”, meaning the universal laws that govern all of reality. These laws are eternal. A Buddha is merely a human being who discovers these laws of reality and compassionately makes them known for others. Buddhism explains the mystery of existence in a way that we can both understand and not understand. This was for a reason: enlightenment must be directly experienced, not simply explained. Properly taught, it should awaken in us a sense of great wonder; a resolve to seek enlightenment ourselves. The Buddha taught that:

1. All of existences is a creation the mind. The true nature of our mind has no particular location in space and no beginning or end in time. It is not born and does not die. The realization of this true nature is known as Nirvana – something so profound and extraordinary that it cannot...


... middle of paper ...


...merous discourses the Buddha said:

Formerly and now, also, it is just suffering and the cessation of suffering that I teach.

Bodhisattva is a Sanskrit word. It is a compound made up of the two words: bodhi which means “awakened” or “enlightened”; and sattva which means “being”. A Bodhisattva is both an “awakened being” and “one who awakens beings”. He is one imbued with great wisdom and compassion who simultaneously strives to perfect his own awakening along with his ability to awaken all other living beings. When the Bodhisattva has totally perfected these, he becomes a Buddha, one already perfected in wisdom and compassion.

Part I of Buddhism: A Brief Introduction is divided into chapters on each of the Four Truths and Vows. A final chapter explains the meaning of Sangha. Each chapter begins with passages from the Sutras to illustrate each of the Vows and Truths.

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