Essay Native American Conflicts

Essay Native American Conflicts

Length: 2534 words (7.2 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Powerful Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

On the summer days of June 25-26, 1876 the Battle of the Little Bighorn took place in the southeastern area of the Montana territory. The battlefield is very close to the Little Bighorn River itself, in what is now present day Big Horn County, Montana. The adversaries in this battle were the U.S. Army’s 7th Cavalry, commanded by General George A. Custer against the Indian tribes of the Northern Cheyenne, Lakota Sioux, and Arapaho under the leadership of Sitting Bull.
Several years after the Civil War had ended, the U.S. army began to focus it’s attention to arising conflicts with Indian tribes in the plains regions. These conflicts were the result of settlers beginning to migrate further out west, mainly in search of more land and gold. As they moved out more and more, they encroached on lands that the Indian tribes considered to be there own. In order to protect the settlers, the U.S. army sent a heavy amount of troops to be stationed in various locations in the plains regions. Eventually, a series of battles were to ensue between the U.S. Army and the Plains Indians. These battles were known as the Sioux Wars, which ranged from the 1860’s to the late 1870’s. During this time period is when the Battle of the Little Bighorn happened. In the early 1870’s, a good deal of Indian tribes in the Northern Plains had agreed moved to agency reservations, however there were still a good amount of Indians who were resisting the change. The ones who were resisting came together and formed an alliance in the Montana Territory to fight off the U.S. troops. In James V. Schneider’s novel, Behind Custer at the Little Bighorn, he discusses that this alliance was formed by Sitting Bull in 1875. Known as the Sun Dance Alliance, it consisted of the C...


... middle of paper ...


... was. They also had no idea at the actual size of the village until they had already began to charge. By then it was too late to pull back and events were already set in motion. When Reno hit the Southern end of the village first, he was shocked to see how big it actually was. He was also extremely surprised at the speed and size of the warrior force that quickly came and met him. The warriors were constantly able to keep the Cavalry on their heels. Reno’s force was no where near prepared when they charged, just like Custer’s force was when they arrived at the Northern end of the camp. Custer, just like Reno was met with unexpected forces. Along with being attacked on his flanks and head on by the Sioux, the Cheyenne warriors came around from the rear, snuck up on the troopers, and surprised them. This resulted in them being surrounded and eventually massacred.






Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay Native American Conflicts

- On the summer days of June 25-26, 1876 the Battle of the Little Bighorn took place in the southeastern area of the Montana territory. The battlefield is very close to the Little Bighorn River itself, in what is now present day Big Horn County, Montana. The adversaries in this battle were the U.S. Army’s 7th Cavalry, commanded by General George A. Custer against the Indian tribes of the Northern Cheyenne, Lakota Sioux, and Arapaho under the leadership of Sitting Bull. Several years after the Civil War had ended, the U.S....   [tags: indians, plains, army]

Powerful Essays
2534 words (7.2 pages)

Culture Conflicts: Native Americans versus The White Man Essay

- People had already been living in America long before the white man ever “discovered” it. These people were known as the Native Americans. Most of them had lived peacefully on the land, for hundreds of years until the early 1800s when white settlers began their move west. As these white settlers came upon the Native Americans, they brought with them unwavering beliefs that would end up causing great conflicts with the Native people, who had their own set of values. It was clear that the white man and the Native Americans could not live among each other peacefully for their values and culture were much too different....   [tags: native americans, land, conflicts]

Powerful Essays
827 words (2.4 pages)

Some of the Puritan Beliefs that Led to Tensions, Conflicts and Concerns among the Coonists and/or Native Americans

- ... these people were received well with enthusiasm and were discovered to believe in ways that were parallel to those of the Europeans. They also held that the supreme God both tested and favored them. In their teachings, the devil’s description was that of a tormentor and a tempter, who tirelessly worked in attempt to disorient them. However, they were encouraged to always be ready for him and defeat him so as to receive God’s promise, eternal salvation. Religion played a significant role in the Native American Society as well as the Puritan Society even though both of them believed in varied ideologies....   [tags: role of religion in American history]

Powerful Essays
934 words (2.7 pages)

Essay about Oppression Of Native American Americans

- ... Some of the Spaniards were accepting of the Indians, wanting to learn more about their culture. Priests would go into Native American tribes, learn the local Indian language, and begin to preach the gospel, persuading the Indians to build a new village based around the belief of Christianity. By forcing the Indians to conform to the Christian religion, the Spanish were stripping the Natives of their own beliefs. The exploration of the New World was a colossal task taken up by England in hopes of generating wealth and benefitting the mother country....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

Powerful Essays
2038 words (5.8 pages)

Essay on Native American Peoples And The English Settlers

- ... For example, in Declaration of the State, Waterhouse explains that, “our God was a good God, much better than theirs, in that he had with so many good things above them endowed us”. Since the time they were born, the English were taught one way and this way was the religion of Christianity. It was their mission to carry out what they’ve been taught and to influence Natives that their God was the only one. At this point in time, the English were desperate and any amount of people to convert to Christianity would benefit the English....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

Powerful Essays
882 words (2.5 pages)

The Systematic Destruction of the Native American Nations in the 1830's Essay example

- In the 1830’s, the American government decided to relocate the Native American peoples to territories west of the Mississippi. The government came up with many reasons that the Native Americans had to move. Those tribes that did not move voluntarily were forcefully relocated from their ancestral lands. This forced move would later be known as The Trail of Tears. The American government came up with many reasons that the Native American peoples needed to move west of the Mississippi. Many Easterners felt that the move would protect Native American culture.1 Many Indians tried to assimilate into the white culture in order to stay on their ancestral lands.2 But the settlers did not like the I...   [tags: Native Americans]

Powerful Essays
1871 words (5.3 pages)

The Native Americans Essay examples

- ... It seems appropriate to begin this essay appreciating the complexity and diversity of Native American societies pre-Columbus, in contrast to what historians previously thought of them. The diversity of the Native Americans stems from their distinctive ideas about religion, which largely influenced their political systems. Some communities were ruled by a single person, as in chiefdoms, others were ruled by several leaders, as in confederacies, and some had no underlying political organization at all....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

Powerful Essays
1762 words (5 pages)

Wars and Conflicts in American History Essay

- War is defined in the Merriam-Webster online dictionary as “1.a. as a state of usually open and declared hostile conflict between states or nations; a period of such armed conflict; 2.a. a state of hostility, conflict, or antagonism; b. a struggle or competition between opposing forces.” War has been a part of this great nation since the beginning. The Seven Years’ War, The Revolutionary War, and The Civil War were some of the bloodiest battles ever fought over the years in the United States. Let’s take a walk through history and look at why these wars were fought, the courses they each took, and the impact they had on the United States today....   [tags: American History]

Powerful Essays
2559 words (7.3 pages)

Native Americans And The Growth Of The West Essay

- Miro Bedrousimasihi Professor Yamane History 371 3 October 2014 Native Americans and the growth of the West For many years removal of Native Americans from their innate land has caused a lot of pain and suffrage for numerous Indians in America. Since early days of America’s discovery there were conflicts and wars between the new settlers and American Indians. A lot of hardship and tragedies were caused to Native Americans during America’s early history, by mostly taking something from them that wasn’t ours to take....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States]

Powerful Essays
1097 words (3.1 pages)

Native american Essay

- People had already been living in the Americas for thousands of years before the Europeans “discovered” the Americas. When the Europeans invaded this land they brought with them diseases such as smallpox, malaria, yellow fever, plague, typhus, and influenza contagions that repeatedly spread through the Native American peoples, killing them in high numbers. At the time the United States was settled by Europeans, it was abundantly populated by dozens of separate nations with diverse civilizations and cultures....   [tags: essays research papers]

Powerful Essays
603 words (1.7 pages)