The Movement of People and Creation of A New Nation Essay

The Movement of People and Creation of A New Nation Essay

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Through the course of history there were many migrations of peoples, such as the Europeans to The New World, or was later to be known as America. The British landed on America's east coast in 1492, it wasn’t long before the European explorers countered the Natives, the Native American Indians. The Natives quickly welcomed and accepted the settlers to the new land they claimed to have discovered, the Natives felt the land was to be shared. They became friends and shared the land and traded goods.

News of good things and a successful trip to The New World got back fast to England, and spread quickly through the rest of Europe. America was everything the settlers hoped for it to be and after a scary long journey over long waters by boat that many people did not live to see. As news of opportunity in the west spread many nations such as the Spanish and the French came to also claim the territory of a generally uncharted land. The new nations all had the same intuitions, to expand their nations. Settlement of other peoples such did not sit well with the British an often lead to problem...

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