Essay on Miranda V. Arizona Case

Essay on Miranda V. Arizona Case

Length: 1116 words (3.2 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Everyone agrees that police should not use unconstitutional methods to coerce a suspect into giving out a confession, yet police have used unauthorized force throughout American history. Fortunately, the Supreme Court created a legal safeguard against police abuses. The safeguards were created in the 1960s after taking a case titled Miranda v. Arizona. Miranda v. Arizona is unarguably one of the most important actions the Supreme Court has taken to prevent police abuses. Many jurisdictions have interpreted Miranda v. Arizona differently and because of the lack of uniformity, Miranda v. Arizona remains a controversial ruling today. This paper will examine the facts of the case, its significant to the legal system.
MIRANDA V. ARIZONA
The landmark decisions elicited out of case involving a man named Ernesto a. According to authors of LANDMARK DECISION OF THE UNITED STATES COURT TWO, Maureen Harrison and Steve Gilbert, Ernesto Miranda “was arrested on suspicion of kidnapping rape (p. 94). After entering custody, he was interrogated by the authorities for several hours without the officers reading his right to remain silent and to ask for an attorney. Eventually he wrote an oral confession that would later be used against him in court. After the trial took its course, he was convicted, but later appealed. The Arizona Supreme Court found nothing wrong with the conduct of the officers, but the Supreme Court reviewed it and stated that Ernesto’s rights were violated when the police interrogated him without informing him of his right to an attorney and to be silent. In its ruling, it stated that the “prosecution may not use statements exculpatory or inculpatory unless” the prosecution informs the suspect of his right to not sel...


... middle of paper ...


... decided to stay silent assuming police do not coerce him of doing any activity that will be self-incriminating, so there were no constitutional violations (Liptak, 2012). This ruling essentially stated that that technical the suspect was not in custody, so Miranda rights were not required. This ruling has further complicated the already confusing Miranda rules.
CONCLUSION
Miranda v. Arizona is a very controversial ruling. Even today, the Supreme Court has not established a clear guideline to applying Miranda rights to suspects. Because of the Ernesto’s case, scholars remain divided over its legal implications, although the Supreme Court does not seem as confused as the scholars. For instance, recent Supreme Court cases have allowed exceptions to the Miranda rule, thus enfeebling Miranda rights. The future of Miranda rights may depend on the American people.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Miranda V. Arizona Case Essays

- The Miranda v. Arizona case not just for the case itself, but also for the significance of the case it had after the case. The Miranda is a nationwide that has changed law enforcement and has changed the rights of an individual. The Miranda rights law took affect after a man named Ernesto Miranda was under arrest by police officers. As police arrested Ernesto Miranda they didn’t read him his rights. Ernest Miranda lived in Phoenix, Arizona where he was charged with rape, kidnapping and robbery. Ernesto Miranda was a criminal, however he was not informed of his legal rights before the arrest....   [tags: Miranda v. Arizona]

Better Essays
1709 words (4.9 pages)

The Miranda V. Arizona Case Essay

- If a seventh grade boy is interrogated by a police officer, he has the pressure to tell the truth; however if an adult was to be interrogated they would know that they have the right to remain silent. This correlates with the Miranda v. Arizona case, stating that you have the right to remain silent, and after you are told these rights anything you say can be used against you in the court of law. And because children are psychologically and socially different from adults this raises the question- if the age of a child subjected to police questioning is also relevant when determining police custody for Miranda purposes....   [tags: Miranda v. Arizona]

Better Essays
1135 words (3.2 pages)

Essay on Miranda V. Arizona Case

- Everyone agrees that police should not use unconstitutional methods to coerce a suspect into giving out a confession, yet police have used unauthorized force throughout American history. Fortunately, the Supreme Court created a legal safeguard against police abuses. The safeguards were created in the 1960s after taking a case titled Miranda v. Arizona. Miranda v. Arizona is unarguably one of the most important actions the Supreme Court has taken to prevent police abuses. Many jurisdictions have interpreted Miranda v....   [tags: Miranda v. Arizona]

Better Essays
1116 words (3.2 pages)

Miranda Vs. Arizona Case Essay

- The landmark case, Miranda vs. Arizona is one of the most important legal cases in the United States. The decision of the case led to the creation of the Miranda Rights, which is still practiced to this day. Miranda Rights- “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say or do can and will be held against you in a court of law. You have the right to speak to an attorney. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you. Do you understand these rights as they have been read to you?” (Decision Date: June.13.1966)....   [tags: Miranda v. Arizona]

Better Essays
735 words (2.1 pages)

Essay Miranda V. Arizona Case

- Miranda v. Arizona is a case that revolutionized the rights of an accused while in custody and interrogation. The Supreme court leaders based the rights of Mr. Miranda by the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution. The fifth amendment has been interpreted though the decision of supreme court rulings into the right to remain silent in an interrogation in order to prevent the accused to testify against himself. This amendment also protects any person from double jeopardy from the same crime, gives him or her a grand jury, and it requires for due process of law to come in effect in case a citizen is denied him or her from their right of life, liberty, or property....   [tags: Miranda v. Arizona]

Better Essays
1071 words (3.1 pages)

Essay on The Case Of Miranda V. Arizona

- MIRANDA 2 The case of Miranda v. Arizona (384 U.S. 436 [1966]) is one of the most important cases in history. It brought about prominent rights that are still existent today in 2015 regarding interrogations and custody. The results of this case are still seen in the current criminal justice system. However, even though the rights that were given to the system by the court, there are still instances today in which these Miranda rights are violated. The concept of Miranda has evolved a lot from a court case to a code used by law enforcement during custodies and investigations....   [tags: Miranda v. Arizona, Police]

Better Essays
1271 words (3.6 pages)

The Case Of Miranda V. Arizona Essay

- In the case of Miranda v. Arizona, the U.S. Courts describes the events as: “Ernesto Miranda, a native of Mexico, living in Phoenix, Arizona, was selected in a police grouping by a woman who implicated him of kidnapping and raping her.” In more detail, Robert Kenneth describes the events as: “Barbara Johnson, an 18 year old, was kidnapped and raped. Johnson was shoved into a man 's car, where he tied her hands and ankles and drove her to the edge of the city, where he raped her. The man drove Johnson near her home, asked her to pray for him and he let her out of the car....   [tags: Miranda v. Arizona]

Better Essays
1104 words (3.2 pages)

The Supreme Court Case Miranda V. Arizona Essay

- The Supreme Court case Miranda V. Arizona examined the Fifth Amendment presences inside the criminal justice system. The Fifth Amendment addresses the "rights of persons," mainly in the context of the criminal justice system also prohibits being tried twice for the same crime, requires due process of the law his also includes the right to not have land taken away by the government which also legally known as eminent domain without due process. No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public...   [tags: Miranda v. Arizona, Police, Law]

Better Essays
1255 words (3.6 pages)

The Case Of Ernesto Miranda Essay

- Ernesto Miranda grew up not finishing high school. He didn’t finish the 9th grade, and he decided to drop out of school during that year. He also had a criminal record and had pronounced sexual fantasies after dropping out of high school. Ernesto Miranda was arrested in Phoenix in 1963. He had raped an 18 yr. girl who was mildly mentally handicapped in March of 1963. He was charged with rape, kidnapping, and robbery. When he was found and arrested, and he was not told of his rights before interrogation....   [tags: Miranda v. Arizona]

Better Essays
1501 words (4.3 pages)

Essay on Miranda Vs. Arizona Law

- Miranda rights are the entitlements every suspect has. An officer of the law is required to make these rights apparent to the suspect. These are the rights that you hear on every criminal investigation and policing show in the country, “You have the right to remain silent, anything you say may be used against you, you have the right to consult an attorney, if you can no t afford an attorney one will be appointed for you.” After the suspect agrees that he or she understands his/her rights, the arrest and subsequent questioning and investigation may continue....   [tags: Miranda v. Arizona]

Better Essays
716 words (2 pages)