Mexican Revolution

Mexican Revolution

Length: 1056 words (3 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Excellent

Open Document

Essay Preview

More ↓
Major Causes of the revolution in Mexico.
Based on John Tutino, From Insurrection to Revolution in Mexico

The Mexican Revolution (1910-1917) was caused by a variety of factors. It is impossible to place the blame on one single event or person because of the complexity of the Mexican people. One thing is for sure, if people are deprived of food and water, they will find a way to obtain enough to survive. History proves that in desperate times people will take matters into their own hands. When a countries leadership wavers, and conditions become poor enough that people are starving, they will respond negatively. It seems that any time the Mexicans lose the ability to grow their own maize they become discontent. Mexicans staple crop is maize, which is then ground into flour to make a large variety of food. Tutinos' study of Mexico links the revolution to many factors as well as compares and contrasts the events of 1910 to the revolts led by Hidalgo in 1810. The failures of the Diaz Regime, economic trouble, poor crop yields, failure of the elite to unify to put down the rebellion, and lack of a natural order of succession, led to the Mexican Revolution and each affected various sectors of Mexico differently. The Mexican Revolution changed the face of Mexico for ever.
Porfirio Díaz was the leader of Mexico for over 35 years. Although the tactics in which he employed to stay in power so long were unsavory, he made significant social and economic changes in Mexico. He was able to pacify the people by doing just enough to keep them from rebelling, and completely transformed their economic system. According to Tutino, Díaz failed by trying to change Mexico to the gold standard. Díaz changed Mexico by redistribution of land and was able to make Mexico a player in the global economy. During his reign the people in Mexico had food and water and minimal self-sufficiency. Why did the country erupt in Revolution in 1910? Was Díaz really too blame? Tutino suggested that while Díaz was not the best leader, at least the areas in the south that had erupted with economic growth due to his changes never joined the Revolution. Díaz did neglect fixing the counties problems and just pacified groups that were upset.

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Mexican Revolution." 123HelpMe.com. 20 Jul 2018
    <https://www.123helpme.com/view.asp?id=157348>.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Mexican Revolution Essay

- The Mexican Revolution      There was a huge revolution in the country of Mexico that started in the year 1910, led by Porfirio Diaz, the president of Mexico in 1910. In the 1860’s Diaz was important to Mexican politics and then was elected president in 1877. Diaz said that he would only be president for one year and then would resign, but after four years he was re-elected as the President of Mexico. Porfirio Diaz and the Mexican revolution had a huge impact on the country of Mexico that is still felt in some places today....   [tags: Mexican History]

Research Papers
1153 words (3.3 pages)

Essay on Pancho Villa’s Role in the Mexican Revolution

- ... Many soldiers were willing to fight for equality and wish to see the government honor their rights. Pancho Villa agreed to take on the fight and attempt to topple the corrupt regime, and he proved himself again and again by taking cities and states one at a time. Having come from the peasant/lower classes of society, he could not stand to see his people exploited. Pancho Villa was one of the few young men who understood his peoples’ suffering and acted upon his beliefs. He joined a team of bandits who effectively raided the rich and distributed the wealth amongst the poor and deprived....   [tags: mexican history, mexican regime]

Research Papers
828 words (2.4 pages)

The Mexican Revolution Essay

- The Mexican Revolution began November 20th, 1910. It is disputable that it extended up to two decades and seized more than 900,000 lives. This revolution, however, also ended dictatorship in Mexico and restored the rights of farm workers, or peons, and its citizens. Revolutions are often started because a large group of individuals want to see a change. These beings decided to be the change that they wanted to see and risked many things, including their lives. Francisco “Pancho” Villa and Emiliano Zapata are the main revolutionaries remembered....   [tags: Politics, Villa, Zapata]

Research Papers
1250 words (3.6 pages)

Essay about The Mexican Revolution and Portfirio Diaz

- For thirty-four years Mexico existed under the dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz. During this time Mexico’s industries flourished however the Mexican people remained deep in poverty with little to no opportunities for educational growth. The Mexican revolution was the result of Diaz’s fall from leadership, the peons need for independence, and resulted in a new beginning for Mexico. The Mexican Revolution began due to Porfirio Diaz not allowing anyone to have a voice or say in whatever it is they must do....   [tags: peons, property, poverty]

Research Papers
997 words (2.8 pages)

Mexican Revolution of 1910 Essay

- In November 1910 the first great social revolution of the 20th century began in Mexico. The Revolution brought forth a number of different leaders pursuing different goals. Early Revolutionary presidents—Francisco Madero and Venustiano Carranza—emphasized the need for political reform. The two most famous military leaders—Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata—responded to the growing demands of the peasants and urban workers for major social and economic reforms. There were also demands for curbs on the social control and political influence exercised by the Roman Catholic Church....   [tags: Dictatorship, Porfirio Diaz, Rebellion]

Research Papers
1393 words (4 pages)

Essay about A Personal Trip to Mexico and The Mexican Revolution

- ... I feel rejected by my own parents. They do not have anything to offer. It is not their fault and I do not blame them so I must take matters into my own hands and so here I am suffering in the frigid cold trying to reach the U.S. border,” another responds. The conversation with these children went on for another ten minutes as I was saddened by the effort of these children traveling together, desperately seeking for a better life. At the next train station, I got off the top of the train and continued into the next city....   [tags: porfirio diaz, nationalism, adventure ]

Research Papers
2887 words (8.2 pages)

Essay about The Mexican Revolution

- The significance of the Mexican revolution lies not in the repercussions this insurrection exerted on the international level, but rather in the way it served as a precursor to the direction the 20th century would follow. For while Mexico had gained significance internationally by being a leading exporter of raw material under Porfioro Diaz, it was not the only Latin American, or Luso-American country to follow this route. One must also bear in mind that the materials being exported out of Mexico were not exclusive to the region....   [tags: essays research papers]

Research Papers
1571 words (4.5 pages)

The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela as a Reflection of the Mexican Revolution

- The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela as a Reflection of the Mexican Revolution In 1910, the first social upheaval of the 20th century was unleashed in Mexico. Known as the Mexican Revolution, its historical importance and impact inspired an abundance of internationally renowned South American authors. Mariano Azuela is one of these, whose novel, "The Underdogs" is often described as a classic of modern Hispanic literature. Having served as a doctor under Pancho Villa, a revolutionary leader of the era, Azuela's experience in the Revolution provides The Underdogs with incomparable authenticity of the political and social tendencies of the era between 1910 and 1920....   [tags: World Literature Mexican Azuela]

Research Papers
2162 words (6.2 pages)

The Mexican Revolution: An Overview Essay

- The Mexican Revolution: An Overview Throughout its history Mexico has had many revolutions. The most famous perhaps is the Mexican Revolution from 1910-1920. The people of Mexico were getting tired of the dictator rule of President Porfino Diaz. People of all classes were fighting in the revolution. The middle and upper classes were dissatisfied with the President’s ways. The lower and working class people had many factors such as poor working conditions, inflation, inferior housing, low wages, and deficient social services....   [tags: Essays Papers]

Research Papers
1483 words (4.2 pages)

Mexican Revolution Essay

- Major Causes of the revolution in Mexico. Based on John Tutino, From Insurrection to Revolution in Mexico The Mexican Revolution (1910-1917) was caused by a variety of factors. It is impossible to place the blame on one single event or person because of the complexity of the Mexican people. One thing is for sure, if people are deprived of food and water, they will find a way to obtain enough to survive. History proves that in desperate times people will take matters into their own hands. When a countries leadership wavers, and conditions become poor enough that people are starving, they will respond negatively....   [tags: World History]

Free Essays
1056 words (3 pages)


Tutino continues by discussing how the labor force in the south was forced into near "chattel slavery" by the landholders in order to repay debts. In these regions there was "agrarian stability" and workers content with their situation. Whereas in the North and Central regions there was the largest number of insurgents sprang up due to a multitude of reasons. The author suggests that it was do to lack of arable land, lack of water, low pay, and broken promises by the landholders, as well as discontent with the corruption of the Díaz Regime. In the northern border area, workers were scarce and the landowners found it difficult to use coercion to entice migrant workers to move thousands of miles from home to work for low wages and in poor conditions, furthermore the workers that were already in place were moved to the fringes of the large plantations. Moving the agrarian people was problematic due to a lack of land suitable for growing maize and a lack of water. Tutino continues by explaining how the aforementioned problems led to agrarian discontent. All of these problems make it easier for Madero, Zapata, and Poncho Villa to gain support. The Díaz regime upset the Elite, agrarian peasantry, small landowners, rancheros, and the vaqueros. Members of all of these groups would join rebel forces led by Zapata, and the infamous Poncho Villa. Unlike the revolts in 1810, the Mexican Revolution was not ignored nor put down by the Elites who actually joined the fighting. The elites had joined together to put down the revolts led by Hidalgo. This is an important difference, which shows a good example of meaningful change caused by mass discontent. The agrarian peoples of Mexico were finally able to gain ground with their complaints.
The political, social, an economic divisions where wide spread throughout the central and northern regions. Diaz had done well at expanding the economic system especially by producing a system of Mexican Railroads. He is also given credit with the economic growth in the Southern Regions. Mexican land owners were losing
land for owing money. For example.
In Central Mexico, a heavily indebted Mariano Riva Palacio lost in 1870 the estates he had worked to acquire since the 1830's, and that had provided the economic base at Chalco that underlay his political dominance of the state of Mexico for years.
Tutino also discussed how interaction with the French could also lead to loss of land. Large chunks of land were broken up under Diaz, in order to redistribute lands in order to yield more productive areas to generate commerce. Crop failures in 1907 were another cause; the people could not afford to import American Maize, and were unable to grow their own crops for subsistence. All of these separate but different events led to the people of Mexico revolting, and brought a significant amount of change to the landscape of Mexico ever since.
In the southern areas were uprisings were held to a minimum, people were still able to feed themselves and their children. The Elite were still making money and able to afford the near slave labor wages by giving the workers who migrated advances on their pay in the off seasons, for a promise to go to work at a later date. This system was used in the North, but ultimately failed because of poor resources, lack of water, lack of Maize, lack of any help from the government and revolutionaries that understood the hypocrisy of the Diaz Regime. People had been pacified for 35 years under Diaz; these people were not happy or even content. They just needed the impetus to force change and Madero, Zapata, and Poncho Villa would prove to be just that.
Return to 123HelpMe.com