Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale Essay

Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale Essay

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If this were to be a world similar to that of Offred’s in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, then this very essay would never even exist. This would be a world in which a woman would certainly not be allowed to sit at a computer and type out her thoughts. Writing, speaking, singing; these are all ways a woman, or any other person, can communicate their own feelings. However, being able to communicate one’s thoughts is not a privilege women can enjoy in Gilead. Women are allowed neither to read nor write, and even their everyday speech must be restrained. Communication, whether it be written or verbal, is truly powerful, so powerful in fact that the government of Gilead thinks to reserve it solely for men. Prohibited from having this power, women of Gilead are not able to tell their story; not able to tell who they are. Women in Gilead, without the advantage of any form of true communication, are not able to be free. The same can be said about our society; a society filled with those who constantly update statuses, review products, and have an entire blog dedicated to their president’s flaws. The Handmaid’s Tale stresses the importance of stories and the written word, the privileges that are sometimes taken for granted in first world modern society.
Throughout the book, it is shown that stories can spread not only the truth that is vital to be heard, but also lies that can be used in order to control a person. The Handmaid’s Tale is a collection of tape recordings of Offred’s account of her life. She is making these recordings in order for others to hear her true story as well as the story of others. For instance, the story of Moira, a friend whom Offred assumes is dead soon after their last encounter, is included in her recou...


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... Commander. The audience is left to wonder, in the end, if Offred really is free. In order to be able to tell her own, uncensored story, Offred has to be free, as this is not something women are allowed to do in Gilead. And, in the very act of telling her story, she becomes free from the horrific past she has been bound to.
Telling a story is a power every person has, one that can never be taken away from them and one that they require in order to survive. People are made of stories and are made to write or speak each of the ones they have. Stories are what separate one person from the millions of others, so it is necessary for each to explore their own. It is also just as important to listen to stories, to read; to be inspired by the thoughts of others. This is how people change, grow, or are set free. This, along with remembering nolite te bastardes carborundorum.

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