Marbury V. Madison ( 1803 ) Essay

Marbury V. Madison ( 1803 ) Essay

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Marbury v. Madison (1803) is one of the most important cases in the history of the Supreme Court. It began in 1800, with the beginning of the Democratic-Republican party of Thomas Jefferson (McBride). John Adams of the Federalist Party had just been defeated and creating political alarm for the group (McBride). John Adams in his final days of presidency decided to appoint a great number of justices of the peace (McBride). The new President Jefferson and his Republicans were infuriated with Adams act before he left office. John Adams passed the Judiciary Act of 1801 that allowed sixteen new federal circuit judges, on his way out of office he nominated all sixteen (American Bar Association). Part of the Judiciary Act of 1801 allowed for legislation to authorize the President to appoint the same number of judges as he thought was necessary.
Labeled the Midnight Judges Adam had appointed to office on his exit was confirmed by the Senate, which was Federalist controlled. (American Bar Association). However, the new President Thomas Jefferson’s had taken office when his secretary of the...

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