The Man Who Knew Too Much by Alfred Hitchcock Essays

The Man Who Knew Too Much by Alfred Hitchcock Essays

Length: 756 words (2.2 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

In this 1956 remake of the 1934 version of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much, Dr. Ben McKenna, played by James Stewart, and Josephine ‘Jo’ Conway, played by Doris Day, inadvertently get involved in an assassination plan after a mysterious Frenchman is murdered and their son is subsequently kidnapped. Hitchcock himself said, “Let’s say the first version was the work of a talented amateur and the second was made by a professional,” (Spoto) to which I interpret as him admitting that his skills and cinematic techniques as a director had improved throughout his career.
This film does have cinematic techniques that are typical of Hitchcock, although not all are necessarily done in the typical way. One technique that is typical is the mother/ son relationship between Jo and Hank, played by Christopher Olsen. This relationship may not be like that of Bruno Anthony and his mom in Strangers On A Train, or like Norman Bates and his mom in Psycho, there is still the close bond between them. Early in the movie, while in the hotel room, Jo and Hank sing Whatever Will Be, Will Be together as Jo gets ready for dinner and Hank gets ready for bed, and is the song which Jo sings later on in the Embassy, too loudly, to capture Hank’s attention.
One technique that is typical, but done in a different way is the wrong man scenario. Hitchcock has done the wrong man scenario in the case of somebody being murdered, and an innocent person trying to prove they are not the murderer. In The Man Who Knew Too Much, Louis Bernard, the mysterious Frenchman the family meet on the bus at the beginning of the film, first believe that they are the couple who have an assassination plot against the Ambassador, but finds out it is not them, but the Drayto...


... middle of paper ...


...airs by Ben.
While this film does have typical Hitchcock cinematic techniques, there are a few that were not used. One of them is the typical Hitchcock blond: promiscuous, uncaring, icy, but in this film, Jo, a blonde, is not promiscuous, in fact, she stopped working on Broadway to live with Ben in Indianapolis, she actually is caring, for her son, and while it can be said she is icy at the beginning for first believing Bernard is a bad guy, and second for thinking the Drayton’s were following them, it can also be taken for being cautious of others. Another would be that this film does not have a lot of female humiliation, although there is the scene at the beginning on the bus when Hank accidentally takes the veil off the Arab woman.



Works Cited
Spoto, Donald. The Art of Alfred Hitchcock, Fifty Years of His Motion Pictures. 2nd. New York: Anchor, 1992. Print.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Man Who Knew Too Much by Alfred Hitchcock Essays

- In this 1956 remake of the 1934 version of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much, Dr. Ben McKenna, played by James Stewart, and Josephine ‘Jo’ Conway, played by Doris Day, inadvertently get involved in an assassination plan after a mysterious Frenchman is murdered and their son is subsequently kidnapped. Hitchcock himself said, “Let’s say the first version was the work of a talented amateur and the second was made by a professional,” (Spoto) to which I interpret as him admitting that his skills and cinematic techniques as a director had improved throughout his career....   [tags: film analysis, cinematic techniques]

Better Essays
756 words (2.2 pages)

The Power of Food in Rope and Alfred Hitchcock's The Man Who Knew Too Much and Thomas C. Foster's Nice to Eat with You: Acts of Communio

- On the first day of school, finding a spot to sit is often the biggest obstacle one can encounter. You cannot sit with just anyone. It has to be with someone we know, and if not, we ask for their permission because we are technically intruding on their meal. It might seem silly, but it is true. Food is a part of life; essential, and we cannot share a meal with just anyone. Alfred Hitchcock illustrates the intimacy that a meal brings to the plot within his films Rope and The Man Who Knew Too Much....   [tags: murder, lunch, relationships]

Better Essays
894 words (2.6 pages)

The Men Who Knew Two Much A Compairson of Hitchocks Classic Original and Remake

- The Men Who Knew Two Much A Compairson of Hitchocks Classic Original and Remake Many works of art can be considered artifacts that hold volumes of information regarding the culture of the people that created them and the historical context in which they lived. Films are also treasures of culture, filled with clues and insights into the attitudes and perceptions of the people of the day. While documentary films obviously present a historical record of people and events, dramatic fictional movies can also reveal the same....   [tags: essays papers]

Better Essays
1708 words (4.9 pages)

Greed Is Too Much Greed Essay

- There is a little too much greed going on in society. My definition of greed is when a limitless person selfishly wants something and the obsessive addictions is that enough is never enough. The dictionaries definition is ‘an inordinate or insatiable longing, especially for wealth, status, and power.’ People do not realize that greed concentrated too much on earthly thoughts. People think the need of wanting something is just a thought, however if you continue to think about it, eventually the person will find a way to allow greed to take over the thoughts....   [tags: Human, Thought, Need, Want]

Better Essays
1034 words (3 pages)

The Man Who Was Almost A Man Essay

- In “The Man Who Was Almost a Man”, the search of power and the coming of age is the key theme in the story because the main character Dave puts himself in a situation where he feels that’s he can’t stand up to the wrongs that he has done. Richard Wright father an uneducated farm worker left home when he was six, so he was raised without a father. Growing up he had a tough childhood due to his mother illness. He and his brother later moved to Mississippi where he was heavily influenced by his grandmother, therefore he displays the coming of age without a father figure in his poem “The Man Who was almost a Man”....   [tags: Man, Boy, Mother, Family]

Better Essays
1234 words (3.5 pages)

Summary Of Richard Wright ' A Man Essay example

- “Almos’ a Man”: Not Knowing Who You Are. The short story of Richard Wright (Almos’ a Man) presents a seventeen year old young man from a community of African American, who was Dave. Dave was struggling with growing up and he was also struggling to know exactly who he was. Dave was used to work with some African American men under a guy named Mister Hawkins. Dave’s job was plowing a field with an old white mule named Jenny. Dave thought he was a man, for he was always seriously wanted to get a gun because he thought gun is a power of a man, getting a gun can make him a man, having a gun can gave him much respect, but Dave was socially treated as a boy....   [tags: Short story, Boy, Man, Gun]

Better Essays
920 words (2.6 pages)

Gender Roles Of Man And Woman Essay

- From the beginning of the human race the gender roles of man and woman appeared to be straightforward. Women, being able to procreate, were sought to as nurturers, while men were to protect and provide for their family. Throughout all cultures, practices and beliefs of individuals toward masculinity significantly vary. Masculinity or manliness associates with characteristics such as strength, bravery, handsomeness, and physique in a male. With the ongoing changes in human history, the term masculinity has greatly evolved....   [tags: Gender, Gender role, Man, Masculinity]

Better Essays
1195 words (3.4 pages)

Essay about Lincoln As I Knew Him

- Lincoln As I Knew Him Over the past decade, historians have gained a new respect for the value of oral history and reminiscence. “For generations serious scholars had discounted this type of historical data as being too easily flawed. It is the very nature of reminiscence that it is history being perceived by individuals, and is therefore susceptible to the human traits of bias, misconception, and utter falsification.” (Harold Holzer) However, work being done by modern scholars has shown that used carefully and selectively, many historical facts and incidents can be divined from these sources....   [tags: Papers]

Free Essays
506 words (1.4 pages)

Inner Happiness in Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea Essay

- Inner Happiness in Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea              Hemingway's view of human nature was that happiness was rare and was found within a man and not in his outside circumstances or surroundings.  Hemingway illustrates this in three ways.  First, he portrays the human nature of Santiago, the main character, as being one of humility and compassion, full of strength and pride.  He is shown not as a gleefully happy man, but one who meets life with a serene, quiet resilience.  Second, Santiago's fellow villagers are shown as shallow and materialistic, with a narrow view of life compared to his.  Their focus on appearances is in sharp contrast to Santiago's focus on intrinsic va...   [tags: Old Man and the Sea Essays]

Better Essays
2777 words (7.9 pages)

Essay on THE MAN

- The Man They Called Danny -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To the millions who watched his story unfold, slain reporter Daniel Pearl was a symbol of loss and national grief. To those who knew him, he was much more. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- by Felicity Barringer Sidebar: Why Reporters Risk It Related Site: Wall Street Journal The Daniel Pearl Foundation THE FILE "JOURNALIST1" on my computer, created after the war in Afghanistan began, is a disjointed record of the fears and losses of the last several months....   [tags: essays research papers]

Free Essays
1987 words (5.7 pages)