Essay on Love Medicine : The Idea Of Love

Essay on Love Medicine : The Idea Of Love

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There are cultural significances to the idea of “love medicine” and how the idea of love comes in different packages. In addition to these cultural images, the significance of “love medicine” can be seen between many separate characters within the novel, however I am going to focus on the following sets of characters: June and Gordie Kashpaw then Lulu Nanapush, Nector Kashpaw (and Marie Lazarre).
Gordie and June
June 's one-night stands are described throughout the book, while at the same time, readers learn there were many people who loved her. Gordie and June are cousins who grew up together, they were inseparable, told each other everything, hunted together and the best of friends (208). As they grew older, against the wishes of the family, they ran off to get married (262). AFter they were married, they had a child named King, and throughout King’s childhood, June was known to leave her home for long periods of time, leaving her husband and son behind. Their marriage not very stable, but Gordie still loved her as explained in conversations between Zelda and Aurelia after June’s death. They commented that he would have done anything for June. After June divorced Gordie, he turned to drinking out of guilt and sadness (14). Zelda wondered why Gordie didn’t let June “go to ruin” because he would still try to help June if she was ever desparate (3).
After June’s death, Gordie could not believe that she was never coming back. He is overcome by grief and love as he goes over their years together in his mind. His love for her is so overpowering that he turns to drinking as a way to block out his memories (208). He also remembers the times he physically hurt June, and that haunts him even more. Goride thinks that June’s ghost comes b...


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...orked (242). All of the feelings of love in this novel succeed in pulling those involved together, whether there were hardships, loss, or other disadvantages. In the end, it is the pure and true love that overcomes all other life obstacles and brings the people back to each other. It is my own understanding that the idea of "love medicine" is the idea there is hope in the world that will heal the wounds that have been inflicted on these intertwined families. The stories do not only speak of the relationships between these characters, but they also relate to social aspects of the Native American culture that fragments individual and the society, for which healing is historically crucial. These social issues include the lures of the colonized “white man 's world” as well as substance abuse, government control, the harshness of the prison system, and organized religion.

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