Essay on The Loss Of Innocence By Harper Lee

Essay on The Loss Of Innocence By Harper Lee

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The illusion of innocence is deeply instilled in the outlook of children. Reality soon takes its grip as kids begin to grow and mature, and they lose their pure qualities that they have once possessed. Their father Atticus shelters Jem and Scout from the town’s disease, teaching them the act of sympathy and how to distinguish the good aspects over glaring at the imperfections of people. The loss of innocence portrayed in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird is exposed as the lives of Jem, Scout, and Dill go through their racist and prejudice society, learning how the worlds dreamlike qualities is nothing more than just a childhood fable. The children’s judgment of people and society quickly sheds as Lee displays the harsh realities to Jem, Dill, and Scout, causing them to abandon their innocent perspectives.
Jem first shows his naïve views as Arthur Radley is introduced into the story as Boo Radley. The sleepy town of Maycomb makes Jem and Scout caught by the toxicity of the rumors, allowing them to further believe the lies they hear about Boo. “He dines on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch” (Lee, 13). These deranged deceptions further displays the innocent quality that Jem has as a child. As his curiosity continues, Jem advances to lead Scout and Dill in their adventures to reveal Boo. In one of their plans, Jems pant gets caught on the gate of the Radley’s house, and Jem does not go back for them until later when they are all in safety. A few days later, Jem explains, “When I went back, they were folded across the fence…like they were expectin’ me” (58). This experience results in Jems first glimpse of Boo as a human being rather than a ghost or monster. With this in mind, Jem begins to realize the mistake he has made to ...


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... childhood dreams come to an end as they wake up to the evils of the sleepy town. Jems naïve views are soon corrupted as he goes through experiences like with Boo Radley, but Jem manages to grow in strength as he sheds his pure qualities and learns to have hope. Jem and Scouts childhood friend Dill represents another killing of a mockingbird, as his innocence is destroyed during his trial experience. Scouts childish views dissipates as she witnesses different events in her life, and she grows in experience and maturity as she encounters racial prejudice, making her learn how to maintain her pure conscience that Atticus has developed without losing hope or becoming cynical. Harper Lee’s novel explores human morality, as she weaves the path from childhood to a more adult perspective, illustrating the evils in a corrupt world how to understand them without losing faith.

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