Essay about Lord Of The Flies And Brave New World

Essay about Lord Of The Flies And Brave New World

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Today people value individuality over all else. Individuality and a combination and variations of numerous beliefs and traditions create a unique culture. Culture can only sustain itself if the governmental authority allows freedom otherwise people become clones or unless the governmental authority restrains people from discriminating against others. A balance of freedom and rules allows for the continued humanization of the individual. William Golding and Aldous Huxley’s contemporary dystopian novels reflect a similar theme. For instance, both Lord of the Flies and Brave New World show how the dehumanization of the individual leads to the destruction of culture. However, the authors’ messages collaborate that both a totalitarian rule and the absolute lack of structure lead to the almost irreversible destruction of culture.
The individuality of each person creates the whole of a culture. Piggy contributes to the group with his knowledge although he has little or no physical capabilities: “A conch he called it” (Golding 15). Without Piggy, Ralph would not have known how to blow the conch and signal a meeting. Golding reveals that every individual can become an asset and benefit the community. The loss of any one person becomes a lost to everyone. Bernard and Helmholtz brought intelligence and creativity to a society lacking both: “A mental excess had produced in Helmholtz Watson effects very similar to those which, in Bernard Marx, were the result of a physical defect” (Huxley 67). The aberration which creates Helmholtz and Bernard adds variety, new thought into the community, and rebels against the world order’s sameness. Bernard rebels against the soma and the fake euphoric relief that it could provide. Huxley shows the persist...


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...e government by whipping himself. Huxley demonstrates how although the government allows the freedom of sex, they do not condone ideals like family, love, attachment. In order to balance out the freedom of sex and promiscuity, repentance must occur and blood must spill so that the world does not completely devolve into a chaotic mess without morality.
William Golding and Aldous Huxley’s novels may appear opposite however the theme remains the same that the dehumanization of the individual will occur without the restraint of individuality and without the freedom of individuality. In fact, both extremes not only lead to the dehumanization of the individual but also result in the collapse of culture. To prevent the collapse individuals must prosper, but have restraints from governmental authorizes to prevent the eradication of other individuals based on discrimination.

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Essay about Lord Of The Flies And Brave New World

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