The Life and Work of Virginia Woolf Essays

The Life and Work of Virginia Woolf Essays

Length: 1357 words (3.9 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

From the early death of her mother at age 13 to the sexual abuse from her own half brothers led to the many mental and emotional breakdowns that made Virginia Woolf, “one of the greatest novelists of the twentieth century…” (“Virginia Woolf” n.page.). Woolf’s, “Kew Gardens”, is a classic short story written in 1919 that shows the importance of women’s rights and illustrates that even when you are surrounded by people you still can feel empty and alone. This significant story reflects Virginia’s life filled with depression even though she was a great success and had a happy marriage.
Most authors are highly educated to become a great success, but Virginia Woolf is not like most authors. “She never had a formal education”________. Her father was a renowned author who gave her “an unlimited access to [his] very extensive library.”¬¬¬¬¬¬¬______. Her brothers were fortunate enough to go to preparatory and public schools and then continue onto college at Cambridge. But due to the time period in London, women were not treated with the same respect that men received. They did not get educations and were expected to stay home and learn how to cook and clean. “’[Later on in life she] described this period in a letter to Vita Sackville-West: "Think how I was brought up! No school; mooning about alone among my father's books; never any chance to pick up all that goes on in schools—throwing balls; ragging; slang; vulgarities; scenes; jealousies!’” (Liukkonen n.page). However, Virginia never let any of these obstacles get in her way of achieving her dreams. Following the death of her father in 1904, her and her siblings moved to Bloomsbury where she soon started her life and career. She soon became a professor at Morley College where she met ...


... middle of paper ...


...n.page). Strongly recognized the most for being a feminist writer, Virginia’s childhood definitely influenced the type of writer she now today became.
Beyond just being an influence to women everywhere, she became such a popular author for the reason that she went above and beyond with her writings. Shmoop Editorial Team says, “Virginia Woolf ventured into uncharted literary terrain—the landscape of the human consciousness.” (n.page). Virginia often doesn’t stick to a plot, she would “structure to employ stream of consciousness to emphasize psychological aspects of her characters.”(“Virginia Woolf” n.page). Her writings were described as modern at the time and out of the ordinary.























Works Cited

Shmoop Editorial Team. "Virginia Woolf: Childhood." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 22 Nov 2009.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Lighthouse By Virginia Woolf Essay

- Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse is a novel dedicated to human emotion and humanity’s innate yearn for interpersonal connection. Woolf’s novel shows how we humans relate and react to the world around us- how we feel about the events we experience, what we perceive about the people we so desperately want to feel close to, and how raw human connection can help us find purpose in our live. Whether it is Mrs. Ramsay tirelessly working to aid her husband in his war against himself or Mrs. McNab contemplating the lives of the people she cleans after, all the characters in Woolf’s novel lack human closeness and try to find that closeness through interpreting what those around them experience....   [tags: Emotion, Marriage, Love, Virginia Woolf]

Strong Essays
1364 words (3.9 pages)

Virginia Woolf 's A Body Of Literature Essay

- One of the most brilliant and influential authors of her time, Virginia Woolf produced a body of literature that effected deep and long lasting impacts on the world around her. Woolf experienced a lifetime of internal conflict and circumstances that were out of her control that eventually drove her to suicide in 1941. Plagued with a history of mental illness and influenced by her nonconformity, her writings have created new outlooks to be explored on topics such as modernism, feminism, androgyny in literature, as well as countless others....   [tags: Feminism, Sociology, Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway]

Strong Essays
1277 words (3.6 pages)

Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women and Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women

- It is as if a window finally cracks open revealing the sun’s rays brightening with the truth that men and women experience different challenges. Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women has to face the music when applied to Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women. In Tannen’s essay the claim that “[t]here is no unmarked women” has trouble withstanding but manages to hold up Woolf’s position of the battle women fought against the traditional norm to the freedom they can possess. First and foremost, Tannen claims that all women are “unmarked” and that leaves the essay with room for doubt....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, Deborah Tannen]

Strong Essays
905 words (2.6 pages)

Essay on To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

- To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf When speaking of modernism in the work Virginia Woolf, scholars too readily use her innovations in style and technique as the starting point for critical analysis, focusing largely on the ways in which her prose represents a departure from the conventional novel in both style and content. To simply discuss the extent of her unique style, however, is to overlook the role of tradition in her creation of a new literary identity. In To the Lighthouse, Woolf's invention reveals itself instead as a reinvention, a recasting of the conventional through the use of the traditional....   [tags: Lighthouse Virginia Woolf Essays]

Strong Essays
2170 words (6.2 pages)

Virginia Woolf's Orlando and the Relationship between Virginia and Vita

- Virginia Woolf's Orlando and the Relationship between Virginia and Vita It has been said the novel Orlando is the longest love-letter ever written; a celebration of the bond between women. The relationship between Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West is well documented and known to have been intimate. That Virginia was passionate and giddy about her relationship with Vita is also known and displayed in Orlando. But Orlando also offers a rare intimate glimpse into the mind of Virginia Woolf. An unselfconscious work, it reveals her mind, talent at play....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Orlando Essays]

Strong Essays
2738 words (7.8 pages)

A Room of Ones Own by Virginia Woolf Essay

- Virginia Woolf, a founder of Modernism, is one of the most important woman writers. Her essays and novels provide an insight into her life experiences and those of women of the 20th century. Her most famous works include Mrs. Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927), Orlando: A Biography (1928), The Waves (1931), and A Room of One's Own (1929) (Roseman 11). A Room of One's Own is an based on Woolf's lectures at a women's college at Cambridge University in 1928. Woolf bases her thoughts on "the question of women and fiction"....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Essays]

Strong Essays
2178 words (6.2 pages)

New Beginnings in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf Essay

- New Beginnings in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf   Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf is a disturbing and powerful work. Ironically, it is disturbing and powerful for many of the same reasons. As the audience watches George and Martha tear savagely at each other with the knives of hurled words, sharpened on pain and aimed to draw blood, the way in which these two relentlessly go at each other is awful to see, yet strangely familiar. Like wounded animals, they strike out at those closest to them, and reminds one of scenes witnessed as a child between screaming parents from a cracked door when one is supposed to be in bed....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf]

Free Essays
1723 words (4.9 pages)

Pagan Elements in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf Essay

- Pagan Elements in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf   "I am preoccupied with history" George observes in Act I (p. 50) of Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. But his relationship with his wife, Martha, seems to lean almost towards anthropology. Pagan social and religious elements in Albee's work seem to clarify and enhance the basic themes of the play.             Pagan trappings adorn the whole structure of the play: the prevalence of alcohol, the "goddamn Saturday night orgies" (p....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf]

Strong Essays
1119 words (3.2 pages)

Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own Essay

- Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own Missing works cited In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf ponders the plight of women throughout history. Woolf 'reads the lives of women and concludes that if a woman were to have written she would have had to overcome enormous circumstances' (Woolf xi). Woolf's initial thesis is that 'a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction' (Woolf 4). Throughout the book, however, she develops other important conditions for artistic creation....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Room One's Own Essays]

Strong Essays
1789 words (5.1 pages)

Essay on Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own

- Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own Though published seventy years ago, Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own holds no less appeal today than it did then. Modern women writers look to Woolf as a prophet of inspiration. In November of 1929, Woolf wrote to her friend G. Lowes Dickinson that she penned the book because she "wanted to encourage the young women–they seem to get frightfully depressed" (xiv). The irony here, of course, is that Woolf herself eventually grew so depressed and discouraged that she killed herself....   [tags: Virginia Woolf A Room of One’s Own]

Free Essays
1324 words (3.8 pages)