The Liberation Theology : A Movement For The End Of Oppression Of Women Essay

The Liberation Theology : A Movement For The End Of Oppression Of Women Essay

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MFeminist liberation theology is a movement arguing for the ending of oppression of women. Christianity and the church are one of the targets of this movement because it perpetuates sexism. Women are not allowed to be ordained ministers in many churches. The language reflects a male bias; God is viewed as a male with masculine language and metaphors. Women often feel excluded from the church because of this male-domination. Harvey Cox and Leo D. Lefebure both present ways in which women can be liberated from oppression; however, their methods of liberation are different.
Harvey Cox’s “Eight Theses on Female Liberation” provides eight ideas about why women need liberation or how liberation will come about. As long as one group remains oppressed, society cannot produce its full potential. The equality that society needs in order to function properly has not yet been reached, whether under a capitalist or socialist government; however, Cox argues that some form of socialism is needed to achieve liberation. Male domination is found in every society. Oppression of women is linked to the oppression of minorities and the poor. Christianity needs to be changed because it approves of this sexism and does nothing to try to create equality. All three aspects of the Holy Trinity are viewed as male: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are all called “He”. Churches do not allow women to be ordained, resulting in a male-dominated leadership. In order for women to gain equality, the change needs to be led by women. No person in power, in this case men, gives up their power willingly. However, men do have a place in helping women become equal. Men need to admit that losing power scares them. After this, men can see how much better society ...


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...n attempt to gain liberation. Cox argues for an elimination of gender roles, especially in the home. Lefebure argues for potentially using Sophia as a way to refer to God. Both Cox and Lefebure include the use of exclusive language as a problem with the Church. Cox raises the issue about language without solving the problem. Lefebure gives an example on how to challenge this language. Both articles see a potential of Christianity to be reformed in order to reflect equality and feminist liberation. Getting rid of required monogamy does not require a split from Christianity for Cox. Also, Christian teachings need to be realigned with Christian practices. If Christianity preaches equality, the church needs to implement this equality. Lefebure presents Sophia as part of church and Biblical tradition. The use of Sophia is a lost part of Christianity, not a break from it.

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